2000

Re: The Merchant of Florida

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2164  Monday, 27 November 2000

From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 26 Nov 2000 12:20:36 -0500
Subject: 11.2126 The Merchant of Florida
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2126 The Merchant of Florida

How about George W as Hal?  Doing lines with Falstaff, driving around
drunk, and insider trading until his conversion when he rises to the
occasion of avenging his father on his enemies, putting down the rebel
Democrats, sending criminals to the chair, and succeeding to the throne
to become the ideal Christian president?

Macbett

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2163  Monday, 27 November 2000

From:           Robert J. Matter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 26 Nov 2000 04:58:02 -0600
Subject:        Macbett

Anyone seen this (new or old translation) and care to comment?  It is
playing in Chicago.

MACBETT Eugene Ionesco's absurdist take on Shakespearean drama is
presented in a new translation by Greasy Joan & Company member Gavin
Witt. Joanna Settle directs this coproduction of Greasy Joan and
Division 13 Productions. Chopin Theatre, 1543 W. Division,
773-761-8284.Previews November 25 through December 1:
Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 PM; Sundays, 5 PM. $15. Opens Saturday, December
2, 8 PM. $30. Through January 21: Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 PM; Sundays, 5
PM; no shows Sunday, December 24 and 31. $20; "pay what you can" on
Thursdays.

-Bob Matter
Hammond, IN

Romeo and Juliet Virus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2161  Monday, 27 November 2000

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 23 Nov 2000 08:32:16 -0800
Subject:        Romeo and Juliet Virus

Hi, guys.

There's an announcement this morning from McAfee of a new virus called
"Romeo and Juliet", that infects Outlook systems.  It is, however,
low-risk, and seems to have nothing to do with the play.  It doesn't,
for instance, promote teen suicide, or fry a couple of print servers in
order that the warring Unix and Windows applications will start talking
to each other.

The announcement is here:
http://technews.netscape.com/news/0-1005-200-3802629.html?pt.nc.htmldisp.hl.ne

Cheers,
Se


Re: SER and H8

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2162  Monday, 27 November 2000

[1]     From:   Eric Luhrs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 24 Nov 2000 17:35:55 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2150 More Provenance . . .

[2]     From:   Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 27 Nov 2000 04:47:00 EST
        Subj:   SER COMPUTER / Carol Barton's Mail


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Luhrs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 24 Nov 2000 17:35:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.2150 More Provenance . . .
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2150 More Provenance . . .

> Recently, however, a computer program designed by English company SER
> Systems determined that Shakespeare was 88 percent likely to have been
> the sole author of "Henry VIII."

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

SER's website gives more details about the program (SERbrainware) and
its results:

        http://www.ser.com/news/101700.htm

Cheers,
Eric Luhrs

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 27 Nov 2000 04:47:00 EST
Subject:        SER COMPUTER / Carol Barton's Mail

A few notes on Carol Barton's post RE: the new SER computer program
which assigns an 88% chance of the authorship of Henry VIII being
Shakespeare alone - -

(1)     An 88% chance of the play being Shakespeare alone presumably doesn't
invalidate claims that PART of the play was written by Fletcher. The
import of such a wide band statistical claim may be doubted in any case
in that it tells us nothing of the possible division of authorship or
comparative rates with the works of Fletcher etc.

(2) Jonathan Hope's findings for Regulation rates of the auxiliary 'do'
and relative markers (who/which/ that/zero) confirmed a distinct
division of authorship in the play contradicting Cyril Hoy's claim that
the play was solely by Shakespeare. Hope divides up the authorship thus:
Section A to Shakespeare, Section B to Fletcher and a strong likelihood
of Section C also being by Fletcher . [A= 1.01,1.02,3.02a,5.01 /B=
1.03,1.04,3.01,5.02,5.03,5.04/C= 2.01,2.02,3.02b,4.01,4.02]

(3) Ward Elliott's more extensive testing of the whole Canon and
Apocrypha (too complicated to list here -ask Ward) also rejects
Shakespeare as sole author of the play and in fact his wide ranging
tests seem to indicate that S's authorship of any part of the play may
be doubted (the play receives a a total of 15 rejections compared to a
Shakespeare Core Profile of maximum 3).

  * What does everyone else think? Agree with Hope/ Elliott or think the
play is Shakespeare's?

  * I hope such a question doesn't collide too much with the banned
'authorship
  question' (?)

Yours,
Marcus

Video Formats

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2160  Monday, 27 November 2000

From:           John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 23 Nov 2000 08:56:22 -0000
Subject:        Video Formats

I suppose if viewed from the Pacific it might appear that "Most other
countries ... have the NTSC system", but the reality is more
complicated.  When colour television was introduced Japan and the US
chose the NTSC system (sometimes dubbed Never Twice the Same Color).
Technical improvements were desirable to suit broadcast conditions in
Europe, so Germany and Britain chose the PAL system, and France and the
Soviet Union chose SECAM.  There were thus three systems for everyone
else to select.  (I am mildly puzzled that Quebec doesn't use SECAM ...)
None of this would matter for DVD, of course, if it wasn't for the
infamous regional coding ...

Oh, and contrary to appearances, Connecticut isn't in the UK!

Regards,
John Briggs

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