Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: October ::
R: Help Finding Passage
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1899  Monday, 9 October 2000.

[1]     From:   Tony Burton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 6 Oct 2000 11:26:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1895 Help Tracking Down a Passage

[2]     From:   William Sutton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 7 Oct 2000 03:19:34 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1895 Help Tracking Down a Passage

[3]     From:   Paul Franssen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 09 Oct 2000 10:42:39 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1895 Help Tracking Down a Passage


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tony Burton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 6 Oct 2000 11:26:17 -0400
Subject: 11.1895 Help Tracking Down a Passage
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1895 Help Tracking Down a Passage

The sort of comment referred to by Gregory Machacek is one I have seen
many times in various forms, but the granddaddy of the genre is
certainly the extended review in H. H. Furness's preface to Much Ado
About Nothing where, after taking a page to list more than a score of
occupations and scholarly achievements which, by the evidence of his
plays and reasoning of scholars Shakespeare surely mastered, Furness
reveals his own view:  "My private conviction is that he mastered
cuneiform; visited America; and remained some time in Boston -- greatly
to his intellectual advantage."

In light of Furness's magisterial authority, who can doubt that
Shakespeare was fluent in Hebrew and, during his wide travels in Italy
passed many a splendid evening enjoying the stimulus of Talmudic and
Kabbalistic exegesis with learned rabbis in Venice and Verona?

Tony B

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Sutton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 7 Oct 2000 03:19:34 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 11.1895 Help Tracking Down a Passage
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1895 Help Tracking Down a Passage

Hello everyone,

I saw a list like this in Captain W. Jaggard's  1923 address to the
Stationer's Hall. Yes he is a descendant of the Folio Jaggard. He was
showing how it was possible for Shakes to have been a printer. He lists
other professions as you desire. The Shakespeare Institute library has a
copy of this flat A3 size book. An interesting read I recommend.

Success.
W.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Franssen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 09 Oct 2000 10:42:39 +0100
Subject: 11.1895 Help Tracking Down a Passage
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1895 Help Tracking Down a Passage

Re Shakespeare's manifold professions:

Perhaps what Gregory Machacek has in mind is the passage in S.
Schoenbaum's *Shakespeare's Lives,* pp. 330 ff. in the 1993 edition?
(that is: section 12, "Faith and Works," in the Victorians chapter).

Paul Franssen
Department of English
University of Utrecht
The Netherlands
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.