2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1926  Thursday, 12 October 2000.

[1]     From:   Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Oct 2000 13:26:52 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1911 Re: Student Essays/Topics

[2]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Oct 2000 11:52:04 -0700
        Subj:   SHK 11.1897 Re: Student Essays/Topics


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Oct 2000 13:26:52 -0500
Subject: 11.1911 Re: Student Essays/Topics
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1911 Re: Student Essays/Topics

I've been following this thread with interest, since one of my jobs next
semester will be a course loosely titled "Shakespeare in Performance,"
which is really geared toward prospective middle/high school language
arts and English teachers who must deal with our man.  I think Sean
Lawrence is right on when he says:

>I'm wondering if perhaps we, as teachers, brought this sort of response
>[generalities and personal opinion rather than supported specifics]
>on ourselves by encouraging students to speak from their own
>perspectives, and then taking it upon ourselves to affirm whatever comes
>out.  We might, moreover, have done something rather similar as
>scholars, in viewing the text as a "hostile otherness", to be read
>against and resisted.  Both tendencies, though they had laudable
>original aims, seem to produce a narcissistic criticism, in which the
>text becomes merely the occasion for the critic to talk about himself,
>or his/her own views, rather than to be challenged and discomfited, as
>by another person.
>
>Cheers,
>Se 

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