2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1948  Thursday, 19 October 2000.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Oct 2000 13:30:56 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Holinshed Anecdote

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Oct 2000 11:18:10 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1947 Re: Holinshed Anecdote

[3]     From:   John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 17 Oct 2000 23:08:33 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1947 Re: Holinshed Anecdote

[4]     From:   Edward Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 Oct 2000 11:45:13 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1947 Re: Holinshed Anecdote

[5]     From:   Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Oct 2000 08:07:35 +1000
        Subj:   Welsh speaking?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Oct 2000 13:30:56 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Holinshed Anecdote

1H4 is a play about false reports and self-serving memory.  The central
paradigm of the play is Falstaff's tale in the tavern about the Gadshill
robbery and its aftermath.  How, I wonder, does the report about the
mutilation of corpses by the Welsh women fit into this pattern?

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 17 Oct 2000 11:18:10 -0700
Subject: 11.1947 Re: Holinshed Anecdote
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1947 Re: Holinshed Anecdote

Terry writes, and Bill Godshalk uncharacteristically agrees, that:

> Sean Lawrence tells us,
>
> 'I see Lady Glendower as a sort of trophy between men, rendered
> voiceless in all but song.'
>
> Voiceless? What on earth can this mean?  The lady has a perfectly good
> voice. She speaks with it, four times.

Of course.  But unless the audience speaks Welsh, they don't benefit
from her meanings.  Wasn't it you who objected to seeing language as
musical?  Surely Lady Mortimer's (n 

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