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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: October ::
Re: Sonnet Suggestion for Analysis
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1988  Tuesday, 31 October 2000.

[1]     From:   Sam Small <
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        Date:   Saturday, 28 Oct 2000 19:05:44 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1982 Sonnet Suggestion for Analysis

[2]     From:   Hugh Grady <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Oct 2000 13:12:41 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1982 Sonnet Suggestion for Analysis


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <
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Date:           Saturday, 28 Oct 2000 19:05:44 +0100
Subject: 11.1982 Sonnet Suggestion for Analysis
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1982 Sonnet Suggestion for Analysis

Absolutely, Laura.  94 (They that have power to hurt . . .) has eluded
me for some time - as it has with many others, I believe.  He seems to
be alluding to superior beings of some sort - at least ones with
superior powers - that if they do no harm they will "inherit heaven's
graces," If these people are not self disciplined they will stink in
their rottenness worse than the "basest weeds".  Perhaps he was
referring to himself in that exulted group - perhaps the "lovely boy" -
we just don't know.  As for shifts in modern meaning, the wonderful line
"They are the lords and owners of their faces" means just what today?
Merely self-discipline?  An actor's reference?  And the many vegetable
references would not have surprised Elizabethan readers as they would be
romantic today.

SAM SMALL

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Grady <
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Date:           Monday, 30 Oct 2000 13:12:41 -0500
Subject: 11.1982 Sonnet Suggestion for Analysis
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1982 Sonnet Suggestion for Analysis

Sonnet 135 ("Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Will') is a classic on
multivalent meanings of the key word "will" with excellent intertextual
links to "Othello" and Iago's use of the term.

Best,
Hugh Grady
 

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