2000

Re: New Globe Book

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1977  Saturday, 28 October 2000.

[1]     From:   Jim Harner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 Oct 2000 11:50:02 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1970 New Globe Book?

[2]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 Oct 2000 12:13:19 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1970 New Globe Book?

[3]     From:   John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 26 Oct 2000 08:44:27 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1970 New Globe Book?

[4]     From:   Nicolas Pullin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 27 Oct 2000 09:40:06 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1970 New Globe Book?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Harner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Oct 2000 11:50:02 -0500
Subject: 11.1970 New Globe Book?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1970 New Globe Book?

Next month's update of the World Shakespeare Bibliography Online will
include the following reviews of Pauline Kiernan's *Staging Shakespeare
at the New Globe*

Duncan-Jones, Katherine. *TLS: The Times Literary Supplement* 6 August
1999, pp. 18-19 (in review-article); Ellis, J. *Choice* 37 (1999-2000):
947; Mitchell, Ian. *Times Higher Education Supplement* 19 November
1999, p. 26; Skura, Meredith Anne. *Studies in English Literature
1500-1900* 40 (2000): 355-94 (especially 368).

Jim Harner

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Oct 2000 12:13:19 -0700
Subject: 11.1970 New Globe Book?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1970 New Globe Book?

Jennifer,

I read the book a year and a bit ago.  I did not keep it, so I can't
refer to it, but if you have any questions, and my memory is up to it,
I'll be happy to answer.  You may wish to take that off list.  I hope
someone can offer to do better for you than that.

It is an interesting book for content, but not a ton of fun to read.  My
overall impression is that it was a bit early in the Globe's life to
have a book evaluating the impact of the Globe in performance, but that
is an impression from someone mostly working outside the Globe Theatre.
It may be different for a Globe worker.  The impact, really the lack of
impact, of boys playing girls playing boys overturns a lot of the ink
that has been spilled in gender studies, as I suspected it would, but it
is so quickly mentioned that anyone, Steven Orgel for example, who
thinks this is very significant can easily dismiss Kiernan's comments.
That would be a shame because she challenges the assumptions, but since
she doesn't try to argue the case she can only convert the choir.

Let's hope someone with a copy will also contact you.

All the best,
Mike Jensen

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 26 Oct 2000 08:44:27 +0100
Subject: 11.1970 New Globe Book?
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1970 New Globe Book?

In response to Jennifer Miller's request, here is some information from
the BookData Premier-CD (BooKFind).  I don't seem to have any
information about a US paperback.

John Briggs

Series: Early Modern Literature in History

STAGING SHAKESPEARE AT THE NEW GLOBE
By Pauline Kiernan (Leverhulme Research Fellow, Shakespeare's Globe,
Bankside, Cheapside, London). Series Edited by Cedric C. Brown

Palgrave, formerly Macmillan Press 1999, Published in UK Published in
Association with The Renaissance Texts Research Centre, University of
Reading 192pp  222 x 141mm  Plates, references, bibliography, index
HARDBACK  UK 


Re: Holinshed Anecdote

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1976  Wednesday, 25 October 2000.

From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Oct 2000 10:29:37 -0400
Subject: Re: Holinshed Anecdote
Comment:        SHK 11.1968 Re: Holinshed Anecdote

Sean Lawrence claims that when Lady Mortimer speaks Welsh she becomes
'effectively isolated from everyone except her father . . . the actors
could have just made a meaningless jabber, used to indicate that they
were speaking in Welsh'.

Oh dear. I suspect that Shakespeare's audience was much less
anaesthetised by English than we are. Try a bit of history. After the
battle of Bosworth, it began to look as if Merlin's prophecies about the
return of a Welsh hero-King to rule over the whole island of Britain had
come true. Henry VII was a Welshman. He packed his court with his
countrymen, named his eldest son Arthur, and observed St. David's day.
With the unfolding of the Welsh Tudor dynasty, Welsh-speakers poured in
to London, moving, as the historian Gwyn A Williams puts it, into 'every
conceivable avenue of advancement'.  The process reached its climax in
the reign of Elizabeth 1, a monarch denounced by A.L.Rowse as 'that
red-headed Welsh harridan'.   One direct result was the rise to
prominence of Welsh families such as that of Dafydd Seisyllt, whose
grandson became William Cecil, Elizabeth's key statesman, or indeed that
of Morgan Williams, which three generations later produced Oliver
Cromwell.  Not surprisingly, Welsh and Welsh-speaking actors found their
way -then as now- onto the stage. At least two of them worked with
Shakespeare.

Under Elizabeth, what Williams calls the 'remote and distinguished past'
of the Welsh effectively made available -at least in influential
intellectual terms- some sort of underpinning for the new 'British'
national identity.  Their very presence bore out claims for the ancient
existence of that complete 'world' of independent Britishness, of which
the Arthurian legends spoke.  Geoffrey of Monmouth's British History
swiftly became semi-official doctrine.   A London Welshman, John Dee,
calling himself Elizabeth's 'Brytish philosopher,' is said to have
coined the term 'British Empire'.  And Dee's proposal of the Welshman
Madoc as the discoverer of America 300 years before Columbus was seized
on by a whole generation as a cultural and quasi-legal weapon against
Spain.

In other words, the Welsh and their language were -and are- part of what
'British' means.  In that context, what on earth can you mean by
'isolated' and 'meaningless jabber'? Perhaps you'd do better to ponder
the implications of the term 'insular'.

T. Hawkes

Re: Eliot on the Elizabethans

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1974  Wednesday, 25 October 2000.

[1]     From:   David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Oct 2000 16:12:44 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1965 Eliot on the Elizabethans

[2]     From:   Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 Oct 2000 11:18:50 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1965 Eliot on the Elizabethans


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Oct 2000 16:12:44 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 11.1965 Eliot on the Elizabethans
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1965 Eliot on the Elizabethans

Any critic may be excerpted, to the critic's cost.  Eliot is often
useful and incisive on the Elizabethans.  His characterization of
Marlowe as a writer of savage and serious farce still strikes me, thirty
years after I first read it, as right on the money.  (Even Mr. Eliot had
an interest in money.)  The long introductory essay called "Seneca in
Elizabethan Translation" is still one of the best things I know on
Seneca and the Elizabethans.  His essays on Shakespeare are less good,
and he disowned them (sort of) as the reflections of a young, or at
least, an immature youngish man.  Would we were all that candid.  On
balance, Eliot on the Elizabethans is very much worth reading.  David
Richman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Oct 2000 11:18:50 +0100
Subject: 11.1965 Eliot on the Elizabethans
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1965 Eliot on the Elizabethans

> (Eliot) On Shakespeare: Perhaps it is a part of his special eminence to have
> expressed an inferior philosophy in the greatest poetry

I can perfectly understand this point of view.  The later Shakespeare
philosophy was opaque to say the least.  I like to think of this view as
a realistic vista of the universe where parallel truths hide and
threaten.  For all Fascists, Christians, Communists, Moslems, Atheists
and other such certain-ists this must be painfully repugnant.  I guess
we have to classify Eliot thus.

SAM SMALL

Screen Saver

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1975  Wednesday, 25 October 2000.

From:           Virginia Byrne This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Date:           Tue, 24 Oct 2000 22:04:50 EDT
Subject:        Screen Saver

Does anyone know of a "Shakespeare" screen saver for MACS?

Re: Guilio Romano

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1973  Wednesday, 25 October 2000.

[1]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Oct 2000 15:33:37 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1967 Guilio Romano

[2]     From:   Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Oct 2000 16:32:37 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1967 Guilio Romano


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Oct 2000 15:33:37 -0400
Subject: 11.1967 Guilio Romano
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1967 Guilio Romano

>Can anyone help me remember the title/author of a recent (1980s/90s)
>book on Guilio Romano, Italian Renaissance art and Shakespeare?

asks Elizabeth Williamson.

Guilio Romano figures largely in Bette Talvacchio's Taking Positions: On
the Erotic in Renaissance Culture (Princeton UP, 1999), while
Shakespeare appears perhaps three times in this inspirational work.  But
see page 251, note 57: Talvacchio, "The Rare Italian Master and the
Posture of Hermione in The Winter's Tale," LIT: Literature
Interpretation Theory 3 (1992): 163-174, which contains a bibliography
that you may find stimulating. (Ah, my fatal Cleopatra!)

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Oct 2000 16:32:37 -0700
Subject: 11.1967 Guilio Romano
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1967 Guilio Romano

Julia Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints (Stanford U.P.), 1996, excellent
book, worth discussing

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