2000

Re: Carters

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1916  Tuesday, 10 October 2000.

From:           William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Oct 2000 00:02:06 +0100
Subject: 11.1904 Re: Carters
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1904 Re: Carters

Tom Berger is too modest to mention it, but the answers to all such
questions can be found in the second edition of: Thomas L. Berger,
William C. Bradford, and Sidney L. Sondergard's "An Index of Characters
in Early Modern English Drama Printed Plays, 1500-1669" CUP, 1998.  I
recommend it highly.

William Proctor Williams

Re: Fops

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1915  Tuesday, 10 October 2000.

[1]     From:   Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 09 Oct 2000 19:07:31 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 11.1869 Re: Fops

[2]     From:   Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 09 Oct 2000 14:45:51 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1896 Re: Fops

[3]     From:   Rita Lamb <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Oct 2000 21:45:26 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1896 Re: Lapwings


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Oct 2000 19:07:31 +0100
Subject: Re: Fops
Comment:        SHK 11.1869 Re: Fops

Harry Hill's reference to Edmund's use of "fop" in King Lear I.2.14
challenges the usual explanations of the word.  Kenneth Muir (Arden 2)
glosses: "fools; not as after the Restoration, dandies", and Weis, Halio
and Foakes all follow suit.  In this interpretation, Edmund refers to
Edgar as a fool, because he can easily dupe or deceive him (" to fop"),
as he subsequently demonstrates.  Stanley Gardner, in his Warwick
edition of the play (1969) cites Burton's Anatomy I.2.1.6, where it is
most discomfortingly explained why scholars beget foolish children:
"they pay their debt (as Paul calls it) to their wives remissly, by
which means their children are weaklings, and many times idiots and
fools."  Pre-Restoration occurrences of "fop" do indeed mainly imply
gullibility or exploitability, but occasionally foppishness is linked
with sartorial excess, as in Marston's Antonio's Revenge (1602), part
II, IV.3.136: "Foole, fop, foole? Marry muffe. I pray you, how manie
fooles haue you seene goe in a suite of Sattin?"  In productions of the
play, it is interestingly often Edmund, not Edgar, who appears in
dandylike apparel, as witnessed by Mark Lockyer, replacing Owen Teale,
in the 1993 RSC Lear featuring the late Robert Stephens in the title
role.

Werner Br


Re: Henry VIII Query

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1913  Tuesday, 10 October 2000.

[1]     From:   Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 09 Oct 2000 18:39:11 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1905 Henry VIII Query

[2]     From:   Brian Vickers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tue, 10 Oct 2000 14:35:21 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1905 Henry VIII Query


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Oct 2000 18:39:11 +0100
Subject: 11.1905 Henry VIII Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1905 Henry VIII Query

> In an 1850 Notes and Queries article on the authorship of Henry VIII,
> Samuel Hickson quotes four lines which he claims are by Shakespeare
> though he does qualify the matter by adding that he had met with these
> lines "in no other edition than Mr. Collier's."  The lines are:
>
> Crowns have their compass; length of day their date;
> Triumphs, their tomb; felicity her fate;
> Of nought but earth can earth make us partaker,
> But knowledge makes a king most like his maker.
>
> A thorough search of several versions of Henry VIII has failed to turn
> up these lines.  Does anyone know where they come from?  Was Collier in
> the habit if inserting extra poetry into his editions?

I would bet my last shirt that Shakespeare didn't write those lines.

SAM SMALL

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Vickers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tue, 10 Oct 2000 14:35:21 +0200
Subject: 11.1905 Henry VIII Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1905 Henry VIII Query

Hickson's 1850 essay on Henry VIII was posthumously reprinted in the
Transactions of the New Shakspere Society in 1874, together with
Spedding's essay of 1850. To it Spedding added a note:" These
lines...are engraved under Simon Passe's print of James sitting on his
throne; which formed the frontispiece to the collection of his works,
printed in 1616. Whoever wrote them ought to have the credit of the true
reading of the third line:

   Crounes haue their compass ; length of days their date ;
   Triumphs, their tomb ; felicity her fate ;
   Of more then earth, can earth make none partaker,
   But knowledge makes the KING most like his maker. " (20*)

Greetings!

Brian Vickers.

Re: Titus Limerick Winners

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1914  Tuesday, 10 October 2000.

From:           Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Oct 2000 14:07:29 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 11.1900 Re: Titus Limerick Winners
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1900 Re: Titus Limerick Winners

Yes, the limericks about Titus were good, although the way the name of
the title character scans, I'm surprised not to see some sentiment for a
higgledy-piggledy (aka double dactyl):

Higgledy Piggeldy
Titus Andronicus
Wanted to cook up a Mother's Day meal.
He made pie to die for,
Heard diners all cry, "More!"
Anthropophagic'ly
Didn't use veal.

I need a better double dactyl word in the sixth line, so I hope someone
will suggest something.

Fran Teague <http://www.arches.uga.edu/~fteague>

Fiona Shaw R2

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1912  Tuesday, 10 October 2000.

From:           Christopher Warley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Oct 2000 12:19:07 -0400
Subject:        Fiona Shaw R2

A colleague of mine has asked me to ask all of you about the
availability on video of a production of Richard II with Fiona Shaw
playing Richard.  Does anyone know anything about it?  You can respond
off list to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Thanks,
Chris Warley
Oakland University

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