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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: September ::
Re: Authentic Performance
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1733  Friday, 15 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Sep 2000 20:49:35 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1722 Re: Authentic Performance

[2]     From:   Peter Groves <
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        Date:   Friday, 15 Sep 2000 12:16:45 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1722 Re: Authentic Performance


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Sep 2000 20:49:35 EDT
Subject: 11.1722 Re: Authentic Performance
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1722 Re: Authentic Performance

For Florence Amit:

The "lock" if it is "loch"in the Scottish fashion, as you say, then
surely the German Loch [=hole] enters one's interpretive ears, no?  A
shy hole indeed!

Harry Hill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Groves <
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Date:           Friday, 15 Sep 2000 12:16:45 +1000
Subject: 11.1722 Re: Authentic Performance
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1722 Re: Authentic Performance

[desunt nonulla]
> Not to make this too long, I speculate that English final ks could
> havebeen usually  pronounced by Shakespeare in the Scottish
> manner, and that
> perhaps only for special, foreign names or in sarcasm would a hard
> k be
> employed.
>
> Florence Amit

The Scottish manner of pronouncing final /k/ is, of course, /k/.  Why
this consonant should sound sarcastic, or how Shakespeare could have had
a Scottish accent (let alone a detailed knowledge of Hebrew) are
mysteries indeed.

Peter Groves
 

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