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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: September ::
Wrinkles in Time: Penn Medieval-Renaissance
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1748  Monday, 18 September 2000.

From:           Erika Lin <
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Date:           Friday, 15 Sep 2000 15:56:51 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Wrinkles in Time: Penn Medieval-Renaissance Conference

Apologies in advance to those of you receiving more than one copy of
this announcement; it is being crossposted to several different lists.
Please do forward it to along to others who might be interested.  We
look forward to a stimulating day and hope you will join us.

Best,
Erika Lin

----

WRINKLES IN TIME: RUPTURES AND CONTINUITIES IN THE WRITING OF THE MIDDLE
AGES AND THE RENAISSANCE

Saturday, October 7, 2000

University of Pennsylvania

This conference will explore both the writings produced during the
Middle Ages and the Renaissance and the ways in which those periods have
themselves been written to meet a variety of subsequent historical and
cultural concerns.

Our day will begin in the newly renovated Houston Hall, located at 3417
Spruce Street, where a continental breakfast will be followed by the
morning paper sessions.  We will break for lunch at the elegant French
bistro La Terrasse, located at 3432 Sansom Street, then return to
Houston Hall for the afternoon paper sessions.  Our day will end in the
Rosenwald Gallery of Van Pelt Library, where our plenary panelists will
discuss "The Future of the Medieval/Renaissance Divide," followed by a
reception and an opportunity to view a special rare books exhibit,
curated in conjunction with the conference.

The registration fee is $15 in advance ($20 at the door) and covers a
continental breakfast, lunch at La Terrasse, and the evening reception.
(If you pay at the door, we cannot guarantee that there will be space
available for lunch, but we will do our best to accomodate you.) To
register, please send your name, email address, and institutional
affiliation along with the registration fee to:

        Wrinkles in Time Conference
        119 Bennett Hall
        Department of English
        University of Pennsylvania
        Philadelphia, PA 19104-6273

Please make checks or money orders payable to the Trustees of the
University of Pennsylvania.

The Wrinkles in Time Conference is sponsored by the Department of
English, the Department of Religious Studies, the Department of Romance
Languages, and the School of Arts and Sciences Dean's Office.

More information about the conference can be found at

        http://www.english.upenn.edu/~wrinkles

Conference Program
------------------

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM -- Registration and Breakfast

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM -- Session 1

  I. Performing Ruptures and Continuities on the Early Modern Stage
  Moderator: Phyllis Rackin (University of Pennsylvania)

        Elizabeth Williamson, (University of Pennsylvania), "Embedded in
        Time: Performance Strategies in _The Winter's Tale_"

        Tim Chesters (Balliol College, Oxford University), "Samuel's
        Ghost: Some Late 16th-Century Readings"

        Erika T. Lin (University of Pennsylvania), "Dancing and Other
        Delights: Presentational 'Entertainments' and Conceptions of
        Identity on the Renaissance Public Stage"

  II. Textual Reception and Revision: Religious Writings
  Moderator: E. Ann Matter (University of Pennsylvania)

        Matthew D. Ponesse (University of Toronto), "Authority, Custom,
        and Reform in a Ninth-Century Commentary on the Rule of St.
        Benedict"

        Christopher Manion (Ohio State University), "Augustine Baker and
        the Invention of the English Mystical Tradition"

        Carl Grindley (University of Victoria), "Radical Puritan Chic:
        Robert Crowley's Reading of _Piers Plowman_"

  III. Historiographic Tensions and Traditions
  Moderator: Larry Scanlon (Rutgers University)

        Daisy Delogu (University of Pennsylvania), "The Writing of
        History in _Melusine_: An Ambiguous Enterprise"

        Kirsten Tranter (Rutgers University), "Royalist Retreat and the
        Politics of Nostalgia in Izaak Walton's _The Compleat Angler;
        or, The Contemplative Man's Recreation_ (1653)"

        Veronica L. Schanoes (University of Pennsylvania), "Hector and
the
        'noys of the peple': The Role of the Vernacular in Chaucer's
        _Troilus and Criseyde_"

10:45 AM - 11:00 AM -- Coffee Break

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM -- Session 2

  I. Recasting Identities of the Self and Nation
  Moderator: Nigel Smith (Princeton University)

        Jamie Taylor (University of Pennsylvania), "Spenser's Spain:
        Plotting Documentary History in _A View of the State of
Ireland_"

        Erin Murphy (Rutgers University), "While You Were Sleeping:
        Reproductive Time and the End of _Paradise Lost_"

        Jean Feerick (University of Pennsylvania), "The Moveable English
        Body: _Cymbeline_, Nova Britannia, and the Quest for a Stable
        Briton"

  II. Material Texts and Modes of Production
  Moderator: William Askins (Philadelphia Community College)

        Tyler Smith (University of Pennsylvania), "' all asse , ' Laid
out
        (and Impressed) in _An Anatomie of the Metamorpho-sed Aiax_"

        Jana Mathews (Duke University), "The Trial of 'Troth' in _Mum
and
        the Sothsegger_"

  III. Mysticism and the Functions of Affective Piety
  Moderator: Rita Copeland (University of Pennsylvania)

        Elizabeth A. Lisot (University of Texas, Dallas), "Painting the
        Mystical: Federico Barocci's Art as Evidence of the Revival of
        Medieval Contemplative Practices during the Catholic
Reformation"

        Jessica Boon (University of Pennsylvania), "Gendered Voices or
        Gendered Scholarship?  Ruusbroec's Appropriation of Hadewijch's
        Mystical Language"

        Susan Arvay (Rutgers University), "Soulful Performances: Margery
        Kempe and the Contemplative Tradition"

12:30 PM - 2:15 PM -- Lunch

2:30 PM - 3:45 PM -- Session 3

  I. Reading Renaissance Queens
  Moderator: Peter Stallybrass (University of Pennsylvania)

        Kristen Brookes (University of California, Santa Cruz),
        "Manipulating the Mermaid: Pleasure and Power in Gower's Armada
        Portrait"

        Lisa Martinez Lajous (University of Pennsylvania), "Poesies for
        Prizes: Queen Elizabeth and the Lottery of 1567"

        John D. Staines (Yale University), "Mary Queen of Scots and the
        Uses of Tragic History"

  II. Rewriting the Past, Reconstructing the Present
  Moderator: Ed Peters (University of Pennsylvania)

        Arthur J. Difuria (University of Delaware), "Vindicta at Pienza:
        Pius II's Parallel Constructions of Architecture and
        Autobiography"

        Marianne Montgomery (University of Virginia), "'Julius Caesar's
        Ill-Erected Tower': England, Rome, and the Tower of London in
        Shakespeare's History Plays"

        Rebekah Long (Duke University), "Picturing Martyred Bodies in
the
        _Acts and Monuments_: The Case of Anne Askew"

  III. Text/Styles: Interpretive Practices over Time
  Moderator: Barbara Traister (Lehigh University)

        Miriam Emma Jacobson (University of Pennsylvania), "Ring Around
        the Poesy: Flowers of Memory in Renaissance Inscription and
        Poetry"

        Ewa Slojka (Harvard University), "The Performative Reader:
        Cervantes' _Don Quixote_ with the _Vulgate Grail_"

        Jennifer Higginbotham (University of Pennsylvania), "Stitches in
        Time: Renaissance Women's Embroidered Texts"

3:45 PM - 4:00 PM -- Coffee Break

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM -- Session 4

  I. Situating the Reformation in History
  Moderator: Sean Keilen (University of Pennsylvania)

        Rebecca Wood (University of California, Santa Barbara),
        "(Re)placing St Thomas a Becket: Reformation Manipulations of
the
        English Past"

        Clare Costley (University of Pennsylvania), "A Text and a Tomb:
        Thomas Bentley's _The Monument of Matrones_ (1582)"

        Genelle Gertz-Robinson (Princeton University), "Reading the
        Reformation: Milton's Logic of Persecution in the
_Areopagitica_"

  II. Interventions in Artistic and Intellectual Paradigms
  Moderator: David Cast (Bryn Mawr College)

        Jennifer Nichols (University of Notre Dame), "The Time of the
        Baroque: Artemisia Gentileschi's Contradictory Subject"

        Keira Travis (McGill University), "The Issue of Epistemic
Rupture
        and Robert Burton's Response to Francis Bacon"

        Meredith Webb (University of Oregon), "The Defaced Artist:
        Caravaggio's Beheadings and the Interruption of Renaissance
        Artistic Discourse"

  III. Critiquing the Critics: The Shaping of Literary Studies
  Moderator: Rebecca Bushnell (University of Pennsylvania)

        James Cahill (Brown University), "_Beowulf_ and the Dating Game"

        Patricia Pender (Stanford University), "Arresting Silence: The
        Critical Reception of Renaissance Women's Modesty Topoi"

        Katheryn Giglio (Syracuse University), "Academic Institutions,
        the Renaissance, and the Student Reader in _The Norton Anthology
        of English Literature_"

5:15 PM - 5:30 PM -- Coffee Break

5:30 PM - 6:30 PM -- Plenary Panel

  Moderator: Kevin Brownlee (University of Pennsylvania)

  The Future of the Medieval/Renaissance Divide

        Christine Chism (Rutgers University)
        Sean Keilen (University of Pennsylvania)
        Katherine Rowe (Bryn Mawr College)
        David Sedley (Haverford College)
        D. Vance Smith (Princeton University)
        Emily Steiner (University of Pennsylvania)

6:30 PM - 8:00 PM -- Exhibit and Reception

  Manual Memory: Collecting and Recording Knowledge, 1300-1700

        This rare book exhibit traces material memory in the Middle Ages
        and the Renaissance in the form of handwritten and printed
        handbooks and early anthologies that were used to store
everything
        from hourly prayers and memorable poems to cosmetic secrets and
        household remedies. Featured books include English, French and
        Italian books of secrets, poetry commonplaces, medieval prayer
        calendars, early modern mechanical manuals, herbals, and
household
        receipts.
 

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