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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: September ::
Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1756  Tuesday, 19 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Sophie Masson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 08:30:51 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1745 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night

[2]     From:   Richard Sherrington <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 10:41:33 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1745 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sophie Masson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 08:30:51 +1000
Subject: 11.1745 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1745 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night

Thank you all for your comments, and very interesting ones too. I must
say I found the film almost perfectly cast (most likely because it
agreed with my own perceptions of the characters!) -- the at times
sinister aggression in Sir Toby, as the Lord of Misrule, fitted in quite
well, I thought, with what I've read of the festival of misrule with its
combination of fun and unpleasantness; Maria had most interesting depths
to her; I thought Aguecheek had an extraordinarily pathetic, almost
tragic aspect to him which is not often brought out; and Feste had that
'inquietant' (sorry, sometimes my English fails me!) aspect of the
Puck-like spirit of misrule and motley--I thought too that the
bittersweetness of the play was most beautifully brought out, and I
thought the transgender things beautifully handled..Malvolio was
terrific too..as were the others..Orsino's evolution from shallow macho
man to the beginings of understanding (one feels Viola still has her
work cut out for her!)is great, and Olivia most believable..my only
caveat was a slight awkwardness in one scene--when you go straight from
Orsino's court to Toby climbing over the wall; it felt like something
had been cut here..

I guess too though that any transposing from stage to screen is bound to
involve certain problems--the settings costumes etc are so gorgeous that
they may distract. They didn't in my case; indeed, it's one of the few
times where I've felt I've just had to buy the video..given that we have
neither TV nor videoplayer in our house(from choice)that's quite
something! I have watched it several times, having hijacked friends'
places for the purpose!  The more I've watched it, the more details I've
noticed; and the more it's made me go back to read what is probably my
most favourite of all Shakespeare's plays. As a kid, I used to love the
kinds of stories where a brave young girl dresses up in men's clothes in
order to pursue her lover who's gone for a soldier, or for adventure or
whatever, probably because I was a shy type with what I hoped was the
hidden heart of a lion, and so Twelfth Night resonated very deeply with
me. I preferred Viola to Rosalind, though of course she was great as
well.

Sophie
Author site: http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Sherrington <
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Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 10:41:33 -0300
Subject: 11.1745 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1745 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night

Paul,

If you haven't already, you may also be interested in watching the
Stratford Canada Festival film of Twelfth Night, available, to the best
of my knowledge, only from the Stratford web site store at
www.stratford-festival.on.ca .  This is my favorite film version of
Twelfth Night.   It's uncut, filmed on their stage but as a film and not
a production before an audience.  It has a wonderful Viola and Feste,
but almost all the performances are excellent.  Stratford Canada's films
of Shakespeare's plays don't seem to be very well known.  They should
be.  In addition to Twelfth Night, there's a well done Much Ado About
Nothing set in the early 20th century as well as The Comedy of Errors,
Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew and As You Like it. The latter
four, unlike the first two, are performances before live audiences so
the actors' voices project a bit loudly for film, but they're still well
worth seeing.  R&J, TS and AYLI are also available as a boxed set or
individually from Amazon.

Richard
 

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