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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: September ::
Re: Carts and Carters
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1776  Thursday, 21 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Roy Flannagan <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 13:23:00 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1763 Carts and Carters

[2]     From:   Werner Broennimann <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 08:58:27 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 11.1763 Carts and Carters


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 13:23:00 -0400
Subject: 11.1763 Carts and Carters
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1763 Carts and Carters

Thomas Hobson of "Hobson's choice" is the most famous carrier of the
17th century, and Milton's three very funny poems memorializing him
provide a definitive picture of what he did for a living.  Check my
Riverside Milton, pp. 62-65.

Roy Flannagan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Broennimann <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 08:58:27 +0100
Subject: Carts and Carters
Comment:        SHK 11.1763 Carts and Carters

Shakespeare's England (1916), vol. 1, 205f. offers this information on
carriers:

"Shakespeare's carriers, who lodge in the inn at Rochester, and have
much to say of their horses, carry in panniers their loads, which
consisted of, besides turkeys, bacon and ginger destined for Charing
Cross (1 Hen. IV, II.1.1-51).  The Stratford-on-Avon lad, John Sadler,
who was Shakespeare's neighbour, and left his native place for London
about the same time as the dramatist, after hiring a horse, 'joined
himself to the carrier'.  Throughout the century, especially in the
north, there were many roads which could be traversed only by
pack-horses and were inaccessible to wheeled traffic.  But before the
seventeenth century opened the carriers who went to and from populous
places invariably employed carts or wagon for the greater part of their
journeys.  Hobson, the Cambridge carrier, 'died', according to his
elegist Milton, 'for heaviness that his cart went light'."

Werner Br

 

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