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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: September ::
Re: Detective Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1779  Thursday, 21 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Geralyn Horton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 14:18:34 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1762 Re: Detective Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Edward Pixley <
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 >
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 10:30:37 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1762 Re: Detective Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geralyn Horton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 14:18:34 -0400
Subject: 11.1762 Re: Detective Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1762 Re: Detective Shakespeare

> Clint, there's a collection of stories by various authors, called
> 'Shakespearean Whodunnits':

I don't recommend this.  My stepdaughter gave it to me for Xmas, and I
began it happily enough.  Alas, I found that most of the stories read as
if they had been written on class assignment -- by students with no
particular affinity for either Shakespeare or modern fiction.

Geralyn Horton, Playwright
Newton, Mass. 02460
<http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton>

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Pixley <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 10:30:37 -0400
Subject: 11.1762 Re: Detective Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1762 Re: Detective Shakespeare

 >James Thurber's 'The Macbeth Murder Mystery' is a splendid example of
> isguided detective work.
>
>John Ramsay

In addition, it's a splendid example of misguided dramatic criticism,
finding all the play's faults and virtues on the expectations of a
particular genre, in this case the "whodunit," and, thereby, sailing
blithely past all the guides that the play provides for a full
experience of its riches.

Ed Pixley
 

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