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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: September ::
Re: Variant texts exercises
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1800  Monday, 25 September 2000.

[1]     From:   James P. Saeger <
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        Date:   Friday, 22 Sep 2000 16:06:34 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1764 Query: Variant texts exercises?

[2]     From:   Bernice W. Kliman <
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        Date:   Friday, 22 Sep 2000 16:58:46 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 11.1796 Re: Variant texts exercises

[3]     From:   Marcus Dahl <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Sep 2000 08:16:56 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1785 Re: Variant texts exercises


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James P. Saeger <
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Date:           Friday, 22 Sep 2000 16:06:34 -0400
Subject: 11.1764 Query: Variant texts exercises?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1764 Query: Variant texts exercises?

  > I seem to recall a discussion several months ago in which various
list
  > members suggested classroom exercises they have used to illustrate
  > collation of variant Shakespearean texts (Q1, Q2, F1 "To be or not
to
  > be," for example). I've done some searching in the SHAKSPER archive,
but
  > can't seem to locate this set of digests.
  >
  > Any and all help is greatly appreciated, whether you recall the
  > discussion or have suggested exercises.

I think best place to start would be with the Complete Works of Steve
Urkowitz.  Not only does he do brilliant readings of performative
differences in variant texts, but his analyses are wonderfully adaptable
to the classroom: I've used them for beginning freshmen and in senior
seminars.

A few years ago an ultra-hip student of mine (a film major and one I'd
not expected to be taken with something that might be perceived as
potentially arcane, even stodgy), said to me "I love this text stuff!"

Here are a few juicy pieces by Steve; he might be persuaded to part with
an offprint or two.  He's on the list and his email is 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
.

   Urkowitz, Steven. "Well-sayd old Mole': Burying Three Hamlets in
Modern
      Editions" in Georgianna Ziegler, ed., Shakespeare Study Today: the
      Horace Howard Furness Lectures (New York, 1986), 37-70

   Urkowitz, Steven. "Two Versions of Romeo and Juliet 2.6 and Merry
Wives
      of Windsor 5.5.215-45: An Invitation to the Pleasures of
Textual/Sexual
      Di(Per)versity." Elizabethean Theater: Essays in Honor of S.
Schoenbaum.
      ed. R.B. Parkier and S. P. Zitner. Newark: U of Delaware Press,
1991.
      222-237.

   Urkowitz, Steven. "Five Women Eleven Ways: Changing Images of
Shakespearean
      Characters in Earliest Texts." Images of Shakespeare. ed. Werner
Habicht,
      D.J. Palmer, Roger Pringle.  Newark: U of Delaware Press, 1988.
292-304.

Hope that's useful.

Best, Jamey

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice W. Kliman <
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Date:           Friday, 22 Sep 2000 16:58:46 -0400
Subject: Re: Variant texts exercises
Comment:        SHK 11.1796 Re: Variant texts exercises

1) Thanks to those who expressed regard for the 3-text Hamlet. If anyone
wants a list of the errata and second thoughts, please contact me
privately. We are still hoping to persuade the publisher, AMS Press, to
produce an inexpensive paperback, but no luck yet.

2) the URL for the Enfolded Hamlet has changed AGAIN. It is now
http://global-language.com/enfolded.html. It now has 4 texts, including
the very important Q6 (1676, 4-line imprint), the first players text,
upon which were based all the players texts through the 18thc. and more.

3) A 4-text Hamlet was begun by Teena Rochfort Smith and published in
1883. She died tragically before she could complete her task, begun as a
member of the Philadelphia SHAKESPEARE Society, and as a protegee of
Furnivall.  Ann Thompson wrote a lovely essay about Smith that appeared
fairly recently in SQ ["Teena Rochfort Smith, Fredrick Furnivall, and
the New Shakspere Society's Four-Text Edition of *Hamlet*," SQ 49
(1998): 125-39]. The UP Library and Folger have copies of the part that
was published. The 4 texts were Q1, Q2, F1 and a revised (or edited)
text. Her ms. has a complex color code.

Paul Bertram and I thought a modern text would make a good 4th column
but then we decided we needed the 4th column for the Q1 transpositions.

Yours,
Bernice

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcus Dahl <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 25 Sep 2000 08:16:56 EDT
Subject: 11.1785 Re: Variant texts exercises
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1785 Re: Variant texts exercises

My favorite variant text exercise is the comparison of folio 2HVI and Q1
First Part of the Contention -particularly the scene [2.2] in which
Richard Duke of York recites his genealogy. The most interesting part
for me is that in both Folio and Quarto (Alexander's arguments to the
contrary) the Genealogy is flawed. Oh the thrill of the chase...
 

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