2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1807  Monday, 25 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Jadwiga Krupski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 23 Sep 2000 12:43:26 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1775 Re: Shakespeare in Schools

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 24 Sep 2000 12:45:12 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 11.1792 Re: Shakespeare in Schools

[3]     From:   Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 25 Sep 2000 08:16:59 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1775 Re: Shakespeare in Schools


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jadwiga Krupski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 23 Sep 2000 12:43:26 -0400
Subject: 11.1775 Re: Shakespeare in Schools
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1775 Re: Shakespeare in Schools

Having successfully produced THE TEMPEST and MSD with Grade 7 kids, I am
obviously on the side of those who believe in early exposure. Children
respond to the plot, adventure and emotion, and then, by using the
language as performing actors, they absorb and enjoy its beauty and
power. In my retirement, I still often meet some not so young people,
our one-time Mirandas, Helenas or Pucks, who talk about our great
adventure with affection -  and maintain that this was the  beginning of
their lifetime love of Shakespeare. Jadwiga Krupski

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 24 Sep 2000 12:45:12 -0400
Subject: Re: Shakespeare in Schools
Comment:        SHK 11.1792 Re: Shakespeare in Schools

I find it rather worrying that L. Swilley bursts into tears at
references to Antony's legs, or King Lear's buttons. This is surely what
comes of being exposed to Shakespeare at an early age. In Britain, most
theatres now offer counselling for such conditions. Indeed, at
Stratford, the possibility of minor surgical intervention and ongoing
nursing care has been considered. The Globe, meanwhile, continues to
rely on leeches and the casting of water.

Terence Hawkes

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 25 Sep 2000 08:16:59 EDT
Subject: 11.1775 Re: Shakespeare in Schools
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1775 Re: Shakespeare in Schools

There lurks a dangerous literary contention beneath all the vigorous
attempts to defend the teaching of *Shakespeare* in schools - namely
that many of the feats attributed to Shakespeare's art in these valiant
replies are not in fact his: the plots for instance or the fact that
many of the character-types listed as being so stimulating are in fact
older and (by now) virtually standard tropes - bad guys (Macbeth) lovers
(R&J) Fools (Stephano & Trinculo etc) Tragic heroes (Hamlet)
...therefore to claim that these kind of stories or scenarios / general
characteristics hold the attention of kindergarten or high school
students is really not of any great import. As I understand it the issue
at stake is that of the complexity / depth (quality) of Shakespeare's
use of 'Early Modern' English. In this I would perhaps recommend a
return to the justifications of Sam Johnson and William Hazlitt -
Shakespeare's *Genius* (if we may use the term without too much
dishonesty in its renaissance sense) is in his linguistic development
and individualisation of *character* - a development so profound that
writers such as T.Hawkes must constantly guard against the apparent
belief of some that S's unique textual characterisations are in fact
'real people'.

Cheers,
Marcus.

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