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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: September ::
Re: Shakespeare in Schools
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1840  Friday, 29 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Sep 2000 08:34:29 -0700
        Subj:   SHK 11.1830 Re: Shakespeare in Schools

[2]     From:   Norman J. Myers <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Sep 2000 13:56:01 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1830 Re: Shakespeare in Schools


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Sep 2000 08:34:29 -0700
Subject: Re: Shakespeare in Schools
Comment:        SHK 11.1830 Re: Shakespeare in Schools

Marcus,

> The defense of Shakespeare's characterization
> cannot be made on grounds of what have become stock
> characters because of his (S's) own popularity. It is a circular
> argument. Find something new guys.

Nobody made that argument.  As with the textual argument, you are the
master of the straw man.  Rule your kingdom well.

Mike Jensen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman J. Myers <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 28 Sep 2000 13:56:01 -0500
Subject: 11.1830 Re: Shakespeare in Schools
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1830 Re: Shakespeare in Schools

Yes, I agree with Marcus Dahl.  To suggest that Shakespeare's language
is too tough for students of any age is to mock those many such as Rex
Gibson and Janet Field-Pickering, who publish valuable works such as
"Discovering Shakespeare's Language," as well as the many seminars on
teaching Shakespeare continually offered by the Folger and others. It's
also to mock the students. Skillful teaching which uses an approach
emphasizing *performance* rather than intellectual theme and image and
cultural studies, does wonders.

Not to say that the kind of stuff we love to discuss and argue about and
make pronouncements on in this discussion list isn't important (it does
keep us employed, after all), but rather to suggest first things first.

Norman Myers
 

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