2000

Re: Use of Dialect

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1746  Monday, 18 September 2000.

From:           Bob Haas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 15 Sep 2000 21:29:04 -0400
Subject: 11.1735 Re: Use of Dialect
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1735 Re: Use of Dialect

Owen Glendower in Henry IV, 1, 3.1, who, in his counsel with Hotspur
makes much of his ability to speak English "lord, as well as you."
Percy, for his part, argues that "no man speaks better Welsh."  There is
room for an accent on Glendower's part, but the role need not be played
that way.  His English accent could be flawless, although he does speak
Welsh later in the same scene.

Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1745  Monday, 18 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Paul E. Doniger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Sep 2000 14:50:14 -0700
        Subj:   Fw: SHK 11.1736 Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night Film

[2]     From:   David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 17 Sep 2000 15:54:40 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1736 Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night Film

[3]     From:   Yvonne Bruce <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 18 Sep 2000 07:01:02 -0400
        Subj:   Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul E. Doniger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Sep 2000 14:50:14 -0700
Subject: 11.1736 Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night Film
Comment:        Fw: SHK 11.1736 Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night Film

I'm with you, Sophie. I did love the Nunn film of _Twelfth Night_, but I
need to make two careful qualifications:

1.      This is my favorite play in the whole world, and I am probably not
very objective; sometimes even a bad version of the play will move me
(this one, however, is not my idea of 'bad'!)-- even the awful Lincoln
Center farcical production has my attention!

2. There are several choices in the play that I don't agree with --
notably the rather harsh opinion the director seems to hold toward Sir
Toby (for example, he cut the line that best show Toby's awareness that
he is sorry for going too far in his punishment of Malvolio).

I did love the film, especially the incredibly sensitive Viola (my
favorite character in Shakespeare, natch). I was very happy to see a
really Puritan Malvolio, rather than a "tragic" one; Sir Andrew was
marvelously real, not the usual cardboard "geck and gull;" and Helena
Bohnam-Carter was an absolutely delightful surprise (who'd have ever
thought of casting her as Olivia!?)!

I teach the play to my advanced acting class, and use the film and
several stage versions in my lessons. My student's generally like this
version best.

Thanks for bringing it up,

Paul E. Doniger
The Gilbert School

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 17 Sep 2000 15:54:40 -0400
Subject: 11.1736 Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1736 Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night Film

I saw Nunn's 12th Night a few months ago and have to count myself among
the dissenters. Aside from not liking some of the script cutting--and
the new additions--I found the lead actress dull, Aguecheek also
miscast, and Feste aggressively despondent. I did like Helena Bonham
Carter as Olivia, and Nigel Hawthorne's Malvolio was good though
overstudied. But the main problem was the direction. The rich sets and
costumes, and especially the overfast cutting make it far too visually
busy. The lines get lost. Not as lost as in Almereyda's new Hamlet, but
still too lost. I don't recommend a bare stage and all closeups either,
but somewhere I think there must be a better balance.

David

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Yvonne Bruce <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Sep 2000 07:01:02 -0400
Subject:        Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night

There was a discussion of this film more recently than a few years
ago--early this summer, I think? I commented on it at some length (I
don't care for it at all), and it has stirred discussion on the list
from time to time, all of which is archived and will provide Ms. Masson,
I hope, with good food for thought. Of course, if the discussion gets
going again, I certainly wouldn't mind blasting it once more.

Yvonne Bruce

Detective Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1743  Monday, 18 September 2000.

From:           Kirk Hendershott-Kraetzer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 15 Sep 2000 09:11:55 -0500
Subject:        Detective Shakespeare

Hello, all.

A colleague of mine has asked for information about a particular kind of
detective fiction, in which English profs are bumped off and the
detective, and reader, has to have knowledge of literary and dramatic
sources to be able to solve the crime.  In particular, he asked about
Shakespeare professors, and the use of Shakespeare in such mysteries.

If you know of any such, please respond to me offline.  Many thanks.

Kirk Hendershott-Kraetzer
Dept. of Humanities
Olivet College

Re: Doubling in Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1744  Monday, 18 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Rachelle Slater <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 17 Sep 2000 20:34:52 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1727 Doubling in Macbeth?

[2]     From:   Thomas Berger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 15 Sep 2000 15:46:50 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1727 Doubling in Macbeth?

[3]     From:   Nicolas Pullin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 18 Sep 2000 11:23:37 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1727 Doubling in Macbeth?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rachelle Slater <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 17 Sep 2000 20:34:52 EDT
Subject: 11.1727 Doubling in Macbeth?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1727 Doubling in Macbeth?

I don't know if I can really help, but I have seen the Porter, the
doctor and Seward all play the same role.  I have also seen the three
witches double as the maids in the banquet scene.

Hope it helps, but I'm sure you will get better suggestions.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Berger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 15 Sep 2000 15:46:50 -0400
Subject: 11.1727 Doubling in Macbeth?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1727 Doubling in Macbeth?

Steve,

T. J. King, Casting Shakespeare's Plays.  Cambridge, 1992

tom berger in haste

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicolas Pullin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 18 Sep 2000 11:23:37 -0500
Subject: 11.1727 Doubling in Macbeth?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1727 Doubling in Macbeth?

The are many possibilities in Macbeth for doubling, ranging from the
straight forward (and often used) Duncan/Siward, and
Seyton/Witch/Murderer, to the more adventurous and experimental.  The
question would be: what type of production are you doing?  Here are some
thoughts: Lady Macbeth/Malcolm--stresses Malcolm's youth and troublesome
sexuality, and LM's strength and political cunning.  Or how about
Duncan/Banquo/Macduff--clearly needs strong editing of some scenes, but
offers a line of leaders, each one rising from the ashes of the previous
to stand in Macbeth's path.  I have performed a version with seven
actors--and have adapted the play for three! Doubling, Doubling, Toil,
and Troubling!

Re: Romeo & Juliet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1742  Monday, 18 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 15 Sep 2000 15:53:52 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet

[2]     From:   Paul S. Rhodes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 15 Sep 2000 15:11:55 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet

[3]     From:   David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 15 Sep 2000 21:47:47 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet

[4]     From:   Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Sep 2000 15:14:19 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 11.1732 open-arse

[5]     From:   Judy Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Sep 2000 12:07:34 -0300 (ADT)
        Subj:   Re: Romeo and Juliet

[6]     From:   Phil Rogers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 18 Sep 2000 08:41:38 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet

[7]     From:   Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 18 Sep 2000 13:01:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 15 Sep 2000 15:53:52 -0400
Subject: 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet

The crux is discussed in detail by Jonathan Goldberg in his essay on the
play in his anthology Queering the Renaissance.  Naturally, G prefers
the "arse" reading.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul S. Rhodes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 15 Sep 2000 15:11:55 -0500
Subject: 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet

"Open[-arse]" is, according to my textual apparatus, an emendation made
by a certain Hosley.  The second and third quartos and the first folia
all have "open, or".  The fourth quarto has "open & catera".  The 'bad'
first quarto has "open Et caetera".

Pax,
Paul S. Rhodes

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 15 Sep 2000 21:47:47 -0600
Subject: 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1732 Romeo & Juliet

Ed Kranz wrote:

>Several texts render line 38 ActII scene1 of R&J as "An open et cetera,
>thou a pop'rin pear!" Bloom has it as "An open arse..." .  Does anyone
>know where Bloom gets this from? Is this accurate?

Q1 has "An open Et caetera thou a pop'rin pear"
Q4 has "An open & catera, and thou a pop'rin pear"
F1 has "An open, or thou a Poprin Peare" (Q2 and Q3 are similar)

Farmer and Henley's *Slang and its Analogues* (1902) were the first to
suggest that "et cetera" in Q1 and Q4 was a euphemism for "open-arse", a
slang dialect term for the medlar, the fruit Mercutio mentioned two
lines earlier.  This emendation makes an obvious bawdy pun in Mercutio's
"O that she were/ An open-arse and thou a poperin ["pop her in"] pear".
It wasn't until Richard Hosley's Yale edition in 1954, though, that an
editor actually adopted this reading, though all major editions since
then have followed suit.  Some have suggested that the "or" of Q2/Q3/F
originated in a compositor's misreading of "ars".

Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 16 Sep 2000 15:14:19 +0100
Subject: open-arse
Comment:        SHK 11.1732 open-arse

Mercutio's speech uses Arcimboldo-like fruit imagery for his obscenities
in Romeo and Juliet II.1.33-41, and he mentions "medlar" twice; hence
Hosley's emendation "open-arse", which is a slangy term for that fruit.

The Folio reads:
O Romeo that she were, O that she were
An open, or thou a Poprin Peare

Q1 has:
open Et Caetera

Modern editions follow Hosley, taking "or" as a misreading of "ars" or
"ers" and interpreting "etc" as a euphemism.  OED entries under
"open-arse" show that the fruit must not be eaten when green, but rather
when very ripe.  Of course readers must pick and choose for themselves.

Werner Br


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