2000

Re: What's It All About, Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1786  Friday, 22 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Jeffrey Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 09:48:13 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1773 Now, what is Hamlet all about?

[2]     From:   Tom Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 09:51:22 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1773 Now, what is Hamlet all about?

[3]     From:   Susan Neill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 08:50:35 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1773 Now, what is Hamlet all about?

[4]     From:   Anders Klitgaard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 22 Sep 2000 12:58:52 CEST
        Subj:   Now, what is Hamlet all about


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeffrey Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 09:48:13 -0400
Subject: 11.1773 Now, what is Hamlet all about?
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1773 Now, what is Hamlet all about?

a) No, he was not right.

b) A patriarchy too rigid placed upon a son too smart.

Jeff Myers

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 09:51:22 -0500
Subject: 11.1773 Now, what is Hamlet all about?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1773 Now, what is Hamlet all about?

>How would you say in just a phrase or a sentence what Hamlet is all
>about?

The following headlines are reported from the various regional tabloids
on the morning after the final unpleasantness at Elsinore:

Royal Family in Crisis -- Again

Norway Strongarms Danes

Traduced -- and Taxed!

Horation Talks: "Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap"

Danish Blue!

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Neill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 08:50:35 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 11.1773 Now, what is Hamlet all about?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1773 Now, what is Hamlet all about?

...A man, with no desire to be a king, trapped between the Rock of Sense
of Duty to a Royal Family and the Hard Place of Desire to Live His Life
for Himself...

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anders Klitgaard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 22 Sep 2000 12:58:52 CEST
Subject:        Now, what is Hamlet all about?

Dear All

Oscar Wilde famously prided himself on having summed up whole
philosophies within his epigrams. Did he succeed? I think not.
Nevertheless, his epigrammatic prose has a value of its own. Does it
make sense to distil the essence of Hamlet into a single sentence?
Strictly speaking, it doesn't - but if one loves apt expressions, one
will embrace Robert Peters' invitation to comment on Goethe's suggestion
that Hamlet is about "a deed too harsh laid upon a soul too weak." As
there clearly is some truth to the statement, we should not focus
attention on whether it is true or false, but rather on the extent to
which it is accurate. This is not to say that one cannot be wrong about
Hamlet, of course - to say that the play is about the future of the
Internet is clearly false! In trying to capture the essence of the play,
I remind myself of Harold Bloom's conviction that Hamlet forms a
category of its own, and, a fortiori, that it lies beyond our grasp.
Granted this, the play must sum itself up; it must not be determined
from outside. I know no better, therefore, than that we thus quote
Hamlet, so as to say, "Hamlet is about having that within which passeth
show."

Yours sincerely,
Anders H. Klitgaard

http://www.oeuvre.org/

Re: Variant texts exercises

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1785  Thursday, 21 September 2000.

From:           Paul E. Doniger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 22:07:26 -0700
Subject: Query: Variant texts exercises?
Comment:        SHK 11.1764 Query: Variant texts exercises?

I have in front of me, thanks to the graces of Inter-Library Loan, a
book called _The Three-Text Hamlet_, edited by Paul Bertram and Bernice
W. Kliman (NY: AMS Press, 1991). It is in oblong format and arranges the
text of these three versions of _Hamlet_ with the aid of Through Line
Numbers and a clever arrangements for the Q1 Transpositions.  I've used
it extensively in researching my MA thesis. I understand there's a
_Four-Text Hamlet_ out there, too, but I've never seen it (is the fourth
text F2 or Q3? ... I'm not sure that it really is necessary or helpful
to go beyong the three texts).

Is this helpful?

Paul E. Doniger
The Gilbert School

African-American Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1783  Thursday, 21 September 2000.

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 20:06:43 -0400
Subject: 11.1717 African-American Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1717 African-American Shakespeare

I only saw the last thirty seconds, but a sit com ended tonight at 7
p.m.  EST with two black actors doing Hamlet. One is helping the other,
who just got a call on his cell phone, saying quietly "to thine own self
be true." And the other guy says, with a big smile on his face, "To thy
phone cell phone be true." That was it. Both men are dressed in period
costumes.

ACMRS Calendar and Newsletter

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1784  Thursday, 21 September 2000.

From:           T. Scott Clapp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 17:49:12 -0700
Subject:        ACMRS Calendar and Newsletter

Please forgive any duplicate posting that may occur.

Dear Medieval and/or Renaissance Scholar,

The latest ACMRS Calendar of Events and Fall Newsletter are now
available on-line. To see the Calendar, please go to
http://www.asu.edu/clas/acmrs/ACMRS_Fall_Calendar_2000.html. To access
the Newsletter, please see
http://www.asu.edu/clas/acmrs/ACMRS_Fall_Newsletter_2000.htm.

Highlights of this semester include:

An affiliate reception at the home of Robert Bjork, Director, on
Saturday, September 30.

Lectures by distinguished scholars such as Helen Cooper (Oxford
University), David Nirenberg, (The Johns Hopkins University), and Edward
M.  Peters (University of Pennsylvania).

And numerous musical events brought to you by the Phoenix Early Music
Society and Ensemble Versailles.

Thank you for your continued support of ACMRS programs.

Sincerely,
T. Scott Clapp

T. Scott Clapp, M.P.A.
Program Coordinator
Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Arizona State University
P.O. Box 872301
Tempe, AZ  85287-2301
Phone: (480) 965-5900; FAX: (480) 965-1681
ACMRS Home Page: http://www.asu.edu/clas/acmrs

Re: The Power of Words

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1782  Thursday, 21 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Marilyn A. Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 18:22:43 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1768 Re: The Power of Words

[2]     From:   Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 16:34:45 -0700
        Subj:   SHK 11.1768 Re: The Power of Words

[3]     From:   Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 09:17:28 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1754 Re: The Power of Words


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marilyn A. Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 18:22:43 -0400
Subject: 11.1768 Re: The Power of Words
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1768 Re: The Power of Words

Charles Weinstein writes,

<<By the way, although my comments on gay actors drew criticism, nobody
has bothered to attack my exactly cognate remarks on short actors.
Since the issue is one of casting, why are the latter fair comment and
the former not?  >>

Frankly, this insistence on typecasting is what's offensive, not merely
the bigoted attitude toward Sher's sexual nature...

Short actors are no more disadvantaged  than tall ones unless a part has
some really determining element... I agree that Sher might find playing
Lincoln too much of a stretch.

Marilyn A. Bonomi

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 16:34:45 -0700
Subject: Re: The Power of Words
Comment:        SHK 11.1768 Re: The Power of Words

What's that expression?  Give them enough rope...

> I did not say that a gay actor could never play Macbeth effectively.

>  But some gay actors certainly can't.

> As a short, gay character actor who specializes in the comic grotesque,
> Antony Sher is at a disadvantage in playing Macbeth.

That sure is a lot of talk about gay actors from someone who suddenly
finds it to his advantage to claim homosexuality isn't the issue.  You
don't even realize that you continue doing this, do you?

Can we agree that some actors are miscast is some roles, and it has
nothing to do with sexual preference?  If not, the statements are
undeniably bigoted, not that this will stop you from denying it.

It also seems significant that Sher is mostly acclaimed in the role, but
you have a elaborate explanation as to why he can't possibly be good
based on his sexuality and height(!).  Yet you claim there is no
bigotry, and seem to mean it.  Well, there was a time I convinced myself
of some pretty silly things.  I needed to believe them, so I did.  I
think I'm past that, but you never know.  At any rate, I think I'm
beginning to understand how you can hold two impossible ideas at the
same time.

By the way, my friend Will is 5' 4" and my friend Dick is 5' 5".  They
would like to have a word with you in the alley.  My friends Tim and
Mike, both 6' 7", are laughing at us all.

6' 1", with no where to go but down,
Mike Jensen

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 21 Sep 2000 09:17:28 +0100
Subject: 11.1754 Re: The Power of Words
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1754 Re: The Power of Words

Charles Weinstein writes: "As a short, gay character actor who
specializes in the comic grotesque, Antony Sher is at a disadvantage in
playing Macbeth."  This is nonsense.  I remember Antony Sher playing
Tamburlaine in the 1992 RSC Swan Theatre production directed by Terry
Hands; no one in the audience would have dreamed of considering his
height or sexual orientation when applauding him.

Werner Br


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