2000

Boxed Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1766  Wednesday, 20 September 2000.

From:           Neil Spence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 11:14:01 -0700
Subject:        Boxed Shakespeare

List members may be interested in a CNN story today on one Carl Martin,
who makes and sells "boxed" versions of the plays for home productions:

http://www.cnn.com/2000/books/news/09/18/boxedbard.ap/index.html

Cheers,
Neil Spence

Re: Doubling in Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1765  Wednesday, 20 September 2000.

From:           Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 12:44:51 -0500
Subject: 11.1744 Re: Doubling in Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1744 Re: Doubling in Macbeth

>The are many possibilities in Macbeth for doubling, ranging from the
>straight forward (and often used) Duncan/Siward, and
>Seyton/Witch/Murderer, to the more adventurous and experimental.  The
>question would be: what type of production are you doing?  Here are some
>thoughts: Lady Macbeth/Malcolm--stresses Malcolm's youth and troublesome
>sexuality, and LM's strength and political cunning.  Or how about
>Duncan/Banquo/Macduff--clearly needs strong editing of some scenes, but
>offers a line of leaders, each one rising from the ashes of the previous
>to stand in Macbeth's path.  I have performed a version with seven
>actors--and have adapted the play for three! Doubling, Doubling, Toil,
>and Troubling!

Mr. Pullin's suggestions are troubling indeed, since what he calls
"strong editing" strikes me as significant revision. Doubling Duncan,
Banquo and Macduff requires eliminating Banquo from the scene (I, iv)
wherein Duncan greets and rewards Macbeth and Banquo for their victory,
from I, vi where Duncan arrives at the Macbeth's castle, from II, iii
where the murdered king is discovered, and finally from III, i his last
encounter with his Macbeth (or else cutting out the queen). God knows,
the play is strong enough to stand such excisions, but the philosophy of
this bothers me.  Presumably the author wanted Banquo in all those
scenes. Presumably he felt the character of Macbeth's friend, and the
one privy to the startling predictions of the witches, contributed
something important to these scenes.

My inclination is all the other way. Rather than looking for ways to
rearrange the text for curiosity's sake, I want to know what happens
with the dynamic of those personalities in contact. Eliminating Banquo
from those episodes strikes me as a serious loss to this dynamic. I
don't see what benefit is gained to compensate for it.

I view this as more a dramatic than literary matter. The mere presence
of a personality on stage colors what happens in significant ways, even
if that personality has few, or no, lines to speak. The actor who is
creating that personality should be able to add that color to what
happens just by his or her presence -- reaction to lines -- body
language -- all of it. The other actors should convey their awareness of
these people, whether by checking their reactions or studiously ignoring
them. But they're all acting, whether speaking or not, and if the author
wrote their characters into the scene, they belong there.

don bloom

Carts and Carters

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1763  Wednesday, 20 September 2000.

From:           Tim Brookes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 11:12:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Carts and Carters

I'm interested in the carters--the teamsters of their day--who made
regular runs to London from many of the principal cities and towns in
Elizabethan England. Does anyone know whether these would have been
horse-drawn, or whether they would have used oxen? And would it have
been one animal, or a team?

Thanks for any help.

Tim Brookes

Query: Variant texts exercises?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1764  Wednesday, 20 September 2000.

From:           David Knauer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 11:36:59 CDT
Subject:        Query: Variant texts exercises?

Dear list members,

I seem to recall a discussion several months ago in which various list
members suggested classroom exercises they have used to illustrate
collation of variant Shakespearean texts (Q1, Q2, F1 "To be or not to
be," for example). I've done some searching in the SHAKSPER archive, but
can't seem to locate this set of digests.

Any and all help is greatly appreciated, whether you recall the
discussion or have suggested exercises.

Thanks,
Dave Knauer

Re: Detective Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1762  Wednesday, 20 September 2000.

[1]     From:   Martin Jukovsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 10:58:43 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1743 Detective Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Werner Habicht <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 19:05:38 +0200
        Subj:   SHK 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare

[3]     From:   John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 16:53:52 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare

[4]     From:   Tony Burton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 18:08:56 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare

[5]     From:   Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 08:13:15 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Jukovsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 10:58:43 -0400
Subject: 11.1743 Detective Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1743 Detective Shakespeare

Try Michael Innes's HAMLET, REVENGE!, though, as I recall, it concerns
an acting troupe rather than university profs.

         --Marty

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Habicht <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 19:05:38 +0200
Subject: Re: Detective Shakespeare
Comment:        SHK 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare

For a list and discussion of some 50 various Shakespearean detective
novels see Susan Baker, "Shakespearean Authority in the Classic
Detective Story", Shakespeare Quarterly, 46 (1995), 424-448.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 16:53:52 -0400
Subject: 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare

James Thurber's 'The Macbeth Murder Mystery' is a splendid example of
misguided detective work.

John Ramsay

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tony Burton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 19 Sep 2000 18:08:56 -0400
Subject: 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare

Having deleted the original question, I can't respond off-list but, as I
recall more or less fuzzily,  Michael Innes' (J.I.M.Stewart's) pre-war
"Hamlet, Revenge" involved killing off many of the members of an
academic theater company which was producing a "Hamlet" that reflected
the special interpretation of its producer-academic guiding spirit.  One
of Innes' earliest and best.

Tony B

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 20 Sep 2000 08:13:15 +1000
Subject: 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1755 Re: Detective Shakespeare

Clint, there's a collection of stories by various authors, called
'Shakespearean Whodunnits': I think it is a Random House paperback but
am not sure. They did a whole series of such collections, including
historical Detectives, Railway Whodunnits etc. The collection in
question mostly springs off from some untied end in one or other of S's
plays.

Sophie
Author site: http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

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