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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: August ::
Re: Music and Time
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1478  Thursday, 10 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Kris McDermott <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 9 Aug 2000 10:23:03 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1474 Music and Time

[2]     From:   Tom Bishop <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 9 Aug 2000 10:34:23 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1474 Music and Time

[3]     From:   Ward Elliott <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 09 Aug 2000 12:51:16 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1474 Music and Time

[4]     From:   Philip Weller <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 09 Aug 2000 14:44:02 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1474 Music and Time

[5]     From:   Ken Emmer <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 09 Aug 2000 21:05:51 -0500
        Subj:   Time


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kris McDermott <
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Date:           Wednesday, 9 Aug 2000 10:23:03 EDT
Subject: 11.1474 Music and Time
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1474 Music and Time

Richard II's last major soliloquy contains all the elements Aimee Luzier
is looking at, beginning at 5.5.42 -

Music do I hear.
Ha, ha; keep time! How sour sweet music is
When time is broke and no proportion kept...

Richard makes an explicit comparison between broken rhythms in music and
the poor use (or understanding) of the limited time humans have; between
a failure to hear music correctly and a failure to listen for portents
of doom.

I've always admired this speech and now have a better frame of reference
for it -- thanks!

Kris McDermott
Central Michigan University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Bishop <
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Date:           Wednesday, 9 Aug 2000 10:34:23 -0500
Subject: 11.1474 Music and Time
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1474 Music and Time

Aimee Luzier asks about music and time, in Shakespeare and elsewhere.

The best short characterization of music I know is Auden's, from his
essay in "The Prince's Dog", where he calls music "a virtual image of
time", referring to optics rather than computing. By this I take him to
mean that music presents a patterned structuring of time which presents
time not as it "is", but as it might be. Music, if you like, is time
fictionalized, and insofar as it brings the activity of fiction to bear
on the universal category of time, is a matter of profound interest to
poets, esp. poets, like Shakespeare, already interested in matters of
time, change and decay. I would say less that this has to do with
"harmonizing the social with the personal" than, more generally, asking
questions and suggesting models of (the possible relations between)
inner and outer "weather". Music seems esp. to have struck Shakespeare
for its polyphonic possibilities, not unlike those that he sought to
exploit in his own poetic practice, and music often stands pointedly FOR
poetry in just those places where complex strands, tensions, and
currents -- historical, psychological, narrative, etc -- are being knit
together, or the action of so knitting is being contemplated.  Along
with Auden, Wilson Knight and John Hollander are good on this aspect,
but there is also some more recent work I'd be happy to note offlist (I
don't feel like typing it out now).

Tom

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ward Elliott <
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Date:           Wednesday, 09 Aug 2000 12:51:16 -0700
Subject: 11.1474 Music and Time
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1474 Music and Time

You might want to look at Ricardo Quinones, The Renaissance Concept of
Time, and Alfred Crosby, The Measure of Reality: Quantification and
Western Society, 1250-1600.  I have not read William McNeil's book with
a title like Moving and Singing Together in Time, but I would like to,
and it sounds pertinent to the topic.

Ward Elliott

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[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Philip Weller <
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Date:           Wednesday, 09 Aug 2000 14:44:02 -0700
Subject: 11.1474 Music and Time
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1474 Music and Time

This looks like a very interesting topic.  I can't help at all, but I'd
like to see what you have to say, particularly about V.i. of The
Merchant of Venice.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ken Emmer <
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Date:           Wednesday, 09 Aug 2000 21:05:51 -0500
Subject:        Time

One of the most amazing books I have ever read about time is called The
Talons of Time.  In the form of a science fiction novel, it explores
time like no other book I've read,

Ken
 

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