2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1489  Friday, 11 August 2000.

[1]     From:   David Siar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 11:29:42 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1485 Course Home Pages

[2]     From:   Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 18:03:32 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1485 Course Home Pages

[3]     From:   Jack Lynch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 13:58:46 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1485 Course Home Pages


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Siar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 11:29:42 -0500
Subject: 11.1485 Course Home Pages
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1485 Course Home Pages

Andrew,

David Worrall, of St. Mary's College, UK, has a Shakespeare course on
line that contains some very useful links to "background" info. Although
the course is for undergrads, its main emphasis is on various
theoretical approaches to Shakespeare, and so there are also useful
theory links.

The URL is:

http://www.smuc.ac.uk/scg/en251/en251_1n.htm

Best wishes,
David Siar

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 18:03:32 +0100
Subject: 11.1485 Course Home Pages
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1485 Course Home Pages

Maybe your students could use the University of Basel "Shakespeare in
Europe" links pages [http://www.unibas.ch/shine/SHINE_Links.htm] as a
starting point. There are links to general topics (Shakespeare
Metasites, Renaissance life, politics, literature, drama theory etc.),
but one can also start from any single play or poem to find links to
"electronic" material  (sources, adaptations, criticism etc.)

The most useful website for teaching that I have found so far is Steven
Marx's "Triangulating
Shakespeare"[http://cla.calpoly.edu/~smarx/Shakespeare/triang/index.html].

Markus Marti

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Lynch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 13:58:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 11.1485 Course Home Pages
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1485 Course Home Pages

Andrew Fleck writes:

    I will be teaching an upper level course on Shakespeare's
    later plays this term and I plan to construct a home page
    for the course. I'd like my page to be more than just a
    syllabus on the web. I am looking for models of effective
    Shakespeare home pages as I begin to construct my own
    site.

You might check out Rebecca Bushnell's course page for an undergraduate
"New Approaches to Renaissance Studies" --

        http://www.english.upenn.edu/~bushnell/english-330/

It's now been several years since it was updated, but Rebecca is working
on the virtual Furness Shakespeare Library, which includes much more
extensive materials:

        http://www.library.upenn.edu/etext/collections/furness/

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