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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: August ::
Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1514  Tuesday, 15 August 2000.

[1]     From:   John Ramsay <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Aug 2000 15:50:42 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

[2]     From:   Pervez Rizvi <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Aug 2000 21:58:17 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Aug 2000 20:41:13 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Messina, Illyria

[4]     From:   Sophie Masson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Aug 2000 09:06:27 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ramsay <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 15:50:42 -0400
Subject: 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

Dorothy Parker co-wrote a stage play entitled 'The Coast of Illyria'
which was performed in Dallas c.1949 but did not make it to Broadway.

Main characters were Charles (Tales from Shakespeare) Lamb, his mad
sister, and S.T. Coleridge.

I have not seen or read the play but I suspect the Coleridge character
would be much engaged in 'the willing suspension of disbelief' -:)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pervez Rizvi <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 21:58:17 +0100
Subject: 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

In response to:

>Illyria is mentioned as a pastoral place name in Ovid and Virgil. Also,
>I believe Isaac Asimov of all people wrote something in a general book
>about Shakespeare that discusses Messina and Illyria as potentially
>real-world locations near Turkey.  Hope this helps."

Messina *is* a real-world location, in Sicily. I am fascinated to learn
that Illyria is used in Ovid and Virgil and it leads me to wonder if
someone can confirm or refute the hypothesis that Shakespeare never
invented a place name. He had the opportunity to do so, in the only play
set in a fantastic place, but did not give a name to Caliban's island.
I'd also like to learn if Shakespeare's contemporaries made up many, or
any, place names.

P.S. I too would like the art/ideology/beavers discussion to stay
on-list. I can't wait to see which of them will first mention the
Zinfandel.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 20:41:13 -0400
Subject:        Re: Messina, Illyria

Messina is a real city in Sicily, across the Strait of Messina from the
boot of Italy.  Illyria is an ancient name for a region on the East
Adriatic coast roughly equivalent to modern day Albania.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sophie Masson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 15 Aug 2000 09:06:27 +1000
Subject: 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

Thank you both. I will chase them up. I have also read--and been told by
other members of the list--that Illyria is in the Balkans, perhaps in
fact in what is now Kosovo. Somebody else in an article argued for
Dubrovnik as the city of Illyria mentioned in Twelfth Night. Of course
that would make Illyria Croatia!

Sophie
Author site: http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm
 

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