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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: August ::
Re: Databases
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1562  Wednesday, 23 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Terrance Kearns <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Aug 2000 08:42:05 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1551 Databases

[2]     From:   Emma French <
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 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 23 Aug 2000 10:11:22 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1551 Databases


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terrance Kearns <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Aug 2000 08:42:05 -0500
Subject: 11.1551 Databases
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1551 Databases

At least through the early 1990's, the program about which Prof. Hieatt
inquires (WordCruncher) was available from the following:

Johnston & Company
     P.O. Box 446
     American Fork, Utah 84003-0446
     801-756-1111 (voice)
     801-756-0242 (FAX)

Terrance Kearns
University of Central Arkansas

[Editor's Note: It has been several years since I spoke with Mr.
Johnston, who I believe purchased WordCruncher from the Brigham Young
University Team that developed the program. However, I discovered about
two years or so ago that WordCruncher had become WordCruncher Publishing
Technologies <http://www.wordcruncher.com/> with no apparent connection
with Mr. Johnston. Currently, the WordCruncher web site contains only
the report of the Annual Meeting of Shareholders, June 2, 2000. In his
progress report on past year, President & CEO Daniel Lunt reports,
"Nearly 14 months ago, we announced our plans "to create a one-of-a-kind
on-line business resource that combines unparalleled search and relevant
content to streamline the process of gathering and using information
on-line." I am not at all sure I know what "a one-of-a-kind on-line
business resource that combines unparalleled search and relevant content
to streamline the process of gathering and using information on-line"
is, but I welcome any information about present state of WordCruncher
and the texts encoded for use with it, that included the Riverside
Shakespeare. -Hardy]

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Emma French <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 23 Aug 2000 10:11:22 GMT
Subject: 11.1551 Databases
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1551 Databases

A quick plea-I have used an online Shakespeare concordance in the past
and found it extremely useful, but I have now misplaced the URL. If
anyone can remind me of the website address I would be extremely
grateful.

Best regards,
Emma French

[Editor's Note: Emma French is most likely inquiring about the so-called
Moby Shakespeare. In my paper "'Take your choice of those that best can
ayde your action": Editing and the Electronic Text," (*CEAMagazine*
Spring 2000: 3-14), a reprint of which can be obtained by sending the
command GET EDITING E_TEXTS to 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 , I write,
"Probably the most easily obtainable plain text edition of Shakespeare
on the web is The Complete Moby(tm) Shakespeare, an edition based on The
Stratford Town modern-spelling edition of 1911, edited by Arthur Bullen
and released on the Internet by Grady Ward.  The Moby Shakespeare can be
download from a number of sites,
<ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/data/shakespeare/>, and is the edition
upon which the MIT "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare,"
<http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/works.html>, and Matty Farrow's
"The Works of the Bard,"
<http://www.gh.cs.oz.au/~matty/Shakespeare/Shakespeare.html>, sites are
based.  Both sites note, however, that "There may be differences between
a copy of a play that you happen to be familiar with and the one of this
server."  This is a bit of an understatement. The Moby Shakespeare is
derived from a text that is about ninety years old and contains
inaccuracies and unconventional pointing." One such "difference" is the
assigning of the last speech in *King Lear* to Albany, as in the quarto,
rather than to Edgar, as in the folio. -Hardy]
 

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