2000

SSE Available in Florida

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1535  Friday, 18 August 2000.

From:           Shenandoah Shakespeare Express <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 12:30:02 EDT
Subject:        SSE Available in Florida

The Shenandoah Shakespeare Express "Charm Your Tongue Tour" (OTHELLO,
TWELFTH NIGHT, and THE ROARING GIRL by Thomas Dekker and Thomas
Middleton) has available dates in central and southern Florida between
10 November 2000 and 15 November 2000.  These dates are prior to the
company's residency in the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Discounted rates are
available during this period.  For more information, or to inquire about
a booking, please contact SSE Director of Booking & Sales Bill Gordon at
(540) 885-5588, or via e-mail at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Re: Romeo Must Die

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1534  Friday, 18 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 10:30:21 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1525 Romeo Must Die

[2]     From:   Toby Malone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 23:00:11 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1525 Romeo Must Die


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 10:30:21 -0400
Subject: 11.1525 Romeo Must Die
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1525 Romeo Must Die

>They get into lots of fights, kiss, and save the
>day at the end.

Sorry, I must protest.  I am fairly certain they never, ever kiss in
this film.  But then, I've only seen it four times in the past few
months.

Tanya "Chop Suey is My Favorite Film Genre" Gough

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Toby Malone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 23:00:11 +0800
Subject: 11.1525 Romeo Must Die
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1525 Romeo Must Die

Hi Jeff -

"Romeo Must Die" is one of the recent proliferations of films based on
Shakespeare's works, but not exactly what might be called an
'adaptation' per se.  Others of note include "10 things I hate about
you" (Shrew); "Forbidden Planet" (Tempest);  "My Own Private Idaho"
(Henry IV); or "West Side Story" (R & J).  There is a fairly exhaustive
list at http://www.imdb.com/Name?Shakespeare,+William .

It is a testament to the enduring nature of the man's works that his
plots and devices are still quite routinely used, even to the point of
almost seeming 'cliche'.

I am new to this mailing list - I have enjoyed the discussion thus far.

Toby Malone
University of Western Australia

Re: Shylock's Daughter

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1531  Friday, 18 August 2000.

From:           Peter Holland <P.D.HOLLAND+AEA-bham.ac.uk>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 13:54:43 +010-
Subject: 11.1516 Shylock's Daughter
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1516 Shylock's Daughter

The novel is a translation from German. It's been very successful there
and highly praised. My daughter (aged 9) loved it. Perhaps I should ask
her to write a review for SHAKSPER.

Video of Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1533  Friday, 18 August 2000.

From:           Jane Drake Brody <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 09:08:05 EDT
Subject:        Video of Hamlet

As an undergraduate, I remember seeing a film of Richard Burton's
"Hamlet." Does anyone have a suggestion as to where I might find a copy
of this production?

Jane Drake Brody

Re: Cymbeline

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1532  Friday, 18 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 08:01:09 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1507 Re: Cymbeline at Shakespeare Santa Cruz

[2]     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 10:14:30 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1527 Re: Cymbeline


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 08:01:09 -0500
Subject: 11.1507 Re: Cymbeline at Shakespeare Santa Cruz
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1507 Re: Cymbeline at Shakespeare Santa Cruz

Terence Hawkes wonders why this dense passage is so impenetrable:

                forthwith they fly
Chickens the way which they stooped eagles: slaves,
The strides they victors made; and now our cowards,
Like fragments in hard voyages, became
The life o' the' need.
(5. 3. 39-45)

Geralyn Horton and others, however, find that the passages are not so
impenetrable.  I agree; I will let the others speak for themselves about
the description of Imogen, but the latter passage is a really
interesting description of the opposition of cowardice and heroism: in
the rout of battle in the "strait lane." Eagles who had once swooped as
conquerors return as chickens; victors who strode as conquerors now
stride as slaves; and our "cowards" (is this a reference to the unknown
and belittled Belarius and Posthumus--"cowards" who had been banished
from "life" at court and favor in the public eye?), "fragments in a hard
voyage" are now the "life of the need," or the fragments of a wreckage
left which sustain the survivors of a wreck after the storm has
demolished the ship.  I may be off on the last comparison--it is dense
and hard to pinpoint exactly--but it is an interesting reversal of how
"the tide in the affairs of men" can be reversed.

Judy Craig

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Aug 2000 10:14:30 -0400
Subject: 11.1527 Re: Cymbeline
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1527 Re: Cymbeline

I have not followed the Cymbeline issue very closely in this
discussion.  But having done the dramaturgy on this play for Mark
Lamos's Hartford Stage production a couple of years ago, I did deal with
that language for many long, long hours.  It has its own character and
can be played very fluidly on stage, surprisingly lucid in delivery.  As
to Tennyson, isn't he said to have carried a volume into his casket with
him or asked for it to be placed there?  But I think this was because
for the 19th century Imogen, as Susanne Collier noted, was represented
throughout the century as the perfect wife, the IDEAL woman -- let your
husband try to kill you and offer him in return pure forgiveness; this
outdid even Cordelia.  But as Felicity Jones discovered and Harriet
Walters attested, Imogen is appealing more for the variability of the
role than the moral perfection of the heroine:  "in one evening an
actress can play a bit of Desdemona, Juliet, Cordelia, Lady Anne,
Rosalind, and Cleopatra," said Ms.  Walters.

Right now, G.B. Shaw's Cymbeline revisited, with the new Shaw ending in
which she does NOT forgive her husband is playing in NY.  Has anyone
seen it? Shaw wasn't so keen on the forgiveness trope at the end!!!

Milla Riggio

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