2000

Taymor Titus DVD

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1515  Tuesday, 15 August 2000.

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 20:26:18 -0400
Subject:        Taymor Titus DVD

My copy of the Titus DVD arrived today. I recommend it highly to members
of this list.  The transfer from film is of very fine quality, and the
many special features are terrific.  There are two discs. The first has
the film (with director commentary and selective scene commentary), and
the second has two trailers, several tv spots, parts of a talk Taymor
gave at Columbia Univ, and a valuable documentary (40 mins) on the
making of the film,

For 20.95 dollars plus 2.90 shipping (priority mail), this is a major
bargain.

For more info and / or to order, go to

http://www.dvdempire.com

DVD empire is the cheapest and fastest dvd online outlet I know.  They
charge close to 2.00 less than Amazon.com to ship and consistently cost
3-5 dollars less per DVD.

Amazon.com charges 24.49 for Titus and 4.69 to ship it.  Both DVDempire
and Amazon orders I've placed take two days to arrive.

I have no financial relation to dvdempire.

Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1514  Tuesday, 15 August 2000.

[1]     From:   John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Aug 2000 15:50:42 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

[2]     From:   Pervez Rizvi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Aug 2000 21:58:17 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Aug 2000 20:41:13 -0400
        Subj:   Re: Messina, Illyria

[4]     From:   Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Aug 2000 09:06:27 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ramsay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 15:50:42 -0400
Subject: 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

Dorothy Parker co-wrote a stage play entitled 'The Coast of Illyria'
which was performed in Dallas c.1949 but did not make it to Broadway.

Main characters were Charles (Tales from Shakespeare) Lamb, his mad
sister, and S.T. Coleridge.

I have not seen or read the play but I suspect the Coleridge character
would be much engaged in 'the willing suspension of disbelief' -:)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pervez Rizvi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 21:58:17 +0100
Subject: 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

In response to:

>Illyria is mentioned as a pastoral place name in Ovid and Virgil. Also,
>I believe Isaac Asimov of all people wrote something in a general book
>about Shakespeare that discusses Messina and Illyria as potentially
>real-world locations near Turkey.  Hope this helps."

Messina *is* a real-world location, in Sicily. I am fascinated to learn
that Illyria is used in Ovid and Virgil and it leads me to wonder if
someone can confirm or refute the hypothesis that Shakespeare never
invented a place name. He had the opportunity to do so, in the only play
set in a fantastic place, but did not give a name to Caliban's island.
I'd also like to learn if Shakespeare's contemporaries made up many, or
any, place names.

P.S. I too would like the art/ideology/beavers discussion to stay
on-list. I can't wait to see which of them will first mention the
Zinfandel.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 20:41:13 -0400
Subject:        Re: Messina, Illyria

Messina is a real city in Sicily, across the Strait of Messina from the
boot of Italy.  Illyria is an ancient name for a region on the East
Adriatic coast roughly equivalent to modern day Albania.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Aug 2000 09:06:27 +1000
Subject: 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1506 Re: Illyria, Messina, etc.

Thank you both. I will chase them up. I have also read--and been told by
other members of the list--that Illyria is in the Balkans, perhaps in
fact in what is now Kosovo. Somebody else in an article argued for
Dubrovnik as the city of Illyria mentioned in Twelfth Night. Of course
that would make Illyria Croatia!

Sophie
Author site: http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

Re: Contentville

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1512  Tuesday, 15 August 2000.

From:           David Knauer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 13:41:46 CDT
Subject: 11.1469 Contentville
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1469 Contentville

More Adventures in Contentville:

After initially feeling annoyed at having my labor exploited by Steve
Brill and EBSCO, I was more than compensated by the attribution of a
1995 book review: "by Knauer, David J.  Faulkner, William".

The "death of the author" indeed.

Dave Knauer
University of Missouri

The New York International Fringe Festival

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1513  Tuesday, 15 August 2000.

From:           Julie Blumenthal <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 16:37:22 GMT
Subject:        Shakespearean Offerings at The New York International Fringe
Festival

For those of you in the NYC Metro area, it's time for my yearly plug for
The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC): 2,000 artists in
1,000 performances by 175 companies in 20 venues in eleven days!

This year, Shakespeare-related offerings include:

HA!HAmlet
Markus Zohner Theater Compagnie; Switzerland
Writer: William Shakespeare; Directors & Actors: Patrizia Barbuiani &
Markus Zohner; Technical Director: Dargo Raimondi
Web site: http://www.zohnertheater.ch
"The most brilliant performance of the festival!" (THE NEWS, Lahore/
Pakistan). Worldwide public and press are enthusiastic about this
completely new approach to theater. One of Europe's leading and most
innovative theater companies presents HA!HAmlet. Two extraordinary
actors perform Shakespeare's famous play in a completely new and
exciting fashion. Swiss Theatre award 2000! US premiere during the world
tour 2000/2001.

Shakespeare's Stoerwork (a german-english monologue)
Art Off! Writer: Martin Rubin; Director: Martin Schnick
Web site: http://hometown.aol.com/dirkauskoeln/myhomepage/index.html
Shit happens! Only minutes away from his big breakthrough, as
Shakespeare


Re: Marx and Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1511  Tuesday, 15 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Aug 2000 09:46:38 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1500 Re: Marx and Shakespeare

[2]     From:   John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Aug 2000 16:16:17 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1500 Re: Marx and Shakespeare

[3]     From:   Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Aug 2000 09:04:30 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1500 Re: Marx and Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 09:46:38 -0400
Subject: 11.1500 Re: Marx and Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1500 Re: Marx and Shakespeare

Re: Marx and Shakespeare

Isn't some of the confusion based on different meanings of the
multivalent term "ideology"? John Drakakis is using it in the
post-Althusserian sense nearer in meaning to anthropological "culture"
than more traditional usages of the term. In this set of meanings
ideology encompasses unspoken or unconscious assumptions linked with
material practices, whereas Ed Taft and Bill Gottshalk are using it in
the American social-science sense (e. g.  Daniel Bell's "The End of
Ideology") as a set of ideas functioning as a (secular) philosophy,
worldview, etc., often "opposed" to art--and I think rightly so, since
ideology in that sense is a development of the Enlightenment which was
the dialectic Other of the ideas of art and the aesthetic that came
about in the same epochal differentiations--see Raymond Williams and
Adorno on this.

One issue is whether art can be "extra"-ideological--that is,
independent of the various material interests influencing
consciousness--something Althusser originally asserted but which has
been a problem for the various post-Althusserian developments.  I'm
wondering what John Drakakis's thinking is on this issue now. David
Hawkes primer "Ideology," among several others, works through much of
this material on the many meanings and problems of notions of ideology.

Is art ideology? Depends on what you mean by ideology.

Best,
Hugh Grady

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Aug 2000 16:16:17 +0100
Subject: 11.1500 Re: Marx and Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1500 Re: Marx and Shakespeare

I think, Jeff Myers, that you'll be banished to the Gulag with Godshalk
and myself if you're not careful!

May I, however, be allowed to express my bafflement at Ed Taft's
comments. If I understand him correctly he is saying that
(a) art 'contains' ideology
(b) art can take up a point of view
(c) ideology is a point of view
(d) therefore ideology is art.

It's one way of reasoning, I suppose, but it doesn't make very much
sense to me, I'm afraid. Ideology is not an object but a 'practice'.
You can either think of it as a set of consciously held ideas ( a
conservative and reactionary interpretation that inscribes intention
into the process and reinforces the notion of a transcendent
individualism) or it is what mediates 'reality' and is therefore active
in its construction and in the process of self-recognition. In this
second interpretation ideology is cognitive and cannot easily be reduced
to the classical Marxist notion of 'false consciousness'. I needn't
rehearse what all this means by way of application to a writer such as
Shakespeare.

2. If Ed Taft thinks that 'biology' can encode the capacity for 'free
will' then he really doesn't understand how 'culture' works. He'll be
telling us next (what Francis Fukuyama attempted to do) that liberal
humanism is the terminus ad quem of the human species, and that the
entire universe longs for the 'freedoms' enshrined in the American
constitution!  Biological determinism means that the organism is
involuntarily subject to its own physical impulses. Once you have got
over the 'biological' capacity for language, where do you go from there?
Can we explain meanings, readings, interpretations by simple reference
to biology? I think not.

3. I'm not a beaver (in any sense of the word) so I have no idea of what
goes on when a beaver builds a dam!  Like Congreve, however, I have
never been able to look at a monkey without feeling some degree of
mortification!

From the Gulag,
John Drakakis

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Aug 2000 09:04:30 +1000
Subject: 11.1500 Re: Marx and Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1500 Re: Marx and Shakespeare

From Ed Taft:

>Sophie Masson may offer a clue in her last e-mail on this subject.
>If I remember right, she espouses a position similar to that of T.S.
>Eliot, who argued that the artistic process "is a continual extinction
>of personality."  If so, then art is both impersonal and even-handed;
>thus, it is somehow BEYOND ideology. At least, that what I understood
>Sophie to say.

From Sophie Masson:

Yes, that's right: I didn't know that quote of Eliot's, but it fits the
bill perfectly, if we take personality to mean ego. I think that
Shakespeare's work is a perfect example of this.

Sophie

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