2000

Renaissance Forum

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1495  Friday, 11 August 2000.

From:           Andrew M Butler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 11 Aug 2000 01:00:43 +0100
Subject:        Renaissance Forum

Renaissance Forum

Volume 4, Number 2 is now available for reading at:
http://www.hull.ac.uk/renforum/current.htm

In this issue:

* Charles Cathcart, 'Plural Authorship, Attribution, and the Children of
the King's Revels.'

* Paul Cefalu, '"The End of Absolutism": Shakespeare's Coriolanus and
the Consensual Nature of the Early Modern State.'

* David Gardiner, '"Oh, How Unlike Unto Orpheus": The Poetics of
Colonization.'

* Lisa Hopkins, '"Ripeness is all": The Death of Elizabeth in Drama.'

And reviews of books by Brown, Fisch, Heale, Hunter, Hutson, Murphy, and
Smith by Richard Dawson Brown, Anne Kelley, Glenn Mynott, Thomas Rist,
Matthew Steggle and Bart van Es.

Cheers,
Andrew Butler
Technical Editor, Renaissance Forum

http://www.hull.ac.uk/renforum/index.html

Calls for Papers: Fantasy and Television Conference (April 2001) and
British Science Fiction Conference (June 2001) contact
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Cymbeline at Shakespeare Santa Cruz

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1494  Friday, 11 August 2000.

From:           Lila Geller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 12:00:50 -0700
Subject: 11.1482 Cymbeline at Shakespeare Santa Cruz
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1482 Cymbeline at Shakespeare Santa Cruz

I saw the Cymbeline at Santa Cruz last weekend and found the production
terribly misconceived.  I felt the director did not like or trust the
play and felt he could make it work only by burlesquing every element of
it. In the process any possible contrast between the serious and the
ludicrous elements of the play was lost.  Moreover, given the
out-of-door festival glen venue, where the actors' unamplified voices
were often difficult enough to hear, their frequent alternation with
amplified music (often parodying the words) and amplified voice-overs
uncomfortably bounced the auditors between blaring and faint.  Yes, the
production pleased many in the audience, but others of us felt that the
unremitting excesses became in time tedious.

The Festival's been extended a week to September 3.  I suggest Love's
Labour Lost, or a surprisingly entertaining production of Sartre's Kean,
Sartre's adaptation of a play by Alexander Dumas about the actor.

Lila Geller
CSU Dominguez Hills

Re: Music and Time

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1492  Friday, 11 August 2000.

From:           Aimee Luzier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thu, 10 Aug 2000 14:00:20 EDT
Subject: 11.1478 Re: Music and Time
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1478 Re: Music and Time

Thanks for the suggestions - I have read Quinones book which was
helpful.  As to Richard II, I might mention the other broken music type
reference in Hamlet (kind of obvious I guess). Talking of Hamlet's
madness, Ophelia says, Like sweet bells jangled out of ____and harsh.  I
leave a blank here because while I've often seen it emended to be
"tune", I have also seen it as "time", which really makes more sense
because bells are played in rhythm.  Each bellringer has a bell with one
note (which are not "tuned") and the music is a result of each
bellringer knowing their moment to ring their particular bell.
Shakespeare also compares "broken music" to physical injury in As You
Like It (...does anyone else long to hear this broken music in their
sides?  during the wrestling match).  Just FYI.

I like the idea that music often occurs at the intersections of various
forms of tension in the plays.  It ties in quite well in Othello and the
whole weaving/spinning motif and in TN in the weavers and spinners that
"weave their threads with bones".  (Bones incidentally seems like an odd
note - reminds me of the three fates.).  Well, I realize this is a
pretty rambling note to post.  This search on time has taken me clear
back to the Greeks and an overenthusiastic degree of horological
research to find out exactly when minute hands DID appear on English
clocks.  So I'm sorry if my post sounds a little ...well, random.  Just
food for thought!

Aimee

Call for Responses to _Early Modern Culture_ Essays

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1493  Friday, 11 August 2000.

From:           David Siar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 13:04:43 -0500
Subject:        Call for Responses to _Early Modern Culture_ Essays

As editors of the new e-journal _Early Modern Culture_
(http://eserver.org/emc), Crystal Bartolovich and I would like to
encourage members of this list to comment on/respond to the essays
and/or responses that appeared in our first issue. We will print these
comments--no matter how long or short--in our "Electronic Seminar"
section as we receive them.  We will also include your name in the first
issue's table of contents page and thus give you credit for your time
and trouble.

Although we've already run a blurb for the journal on this site, I'll
mention once again the first issue's "core" contributors and essay
titles:

Jean E. Howard: "Civic Institutions and Precarious Masculinity in
Dekker's _The Honest Whore_"
Theodore B. Leinwand: Response

Peter Stallybrass: "The Value of Culture and the Disavowal of Things"
Crystal Bartolovich: Response

Carol Banks and Graham Holderness: "'Effeminate Dayes'" Phyllis Rackin:
Response

Valerie Wayne: "The Career of _Cymbeline_'s Manacle" Garrett A.
Sullivan, Jr.: Response

The Electronic Seminar
(Jyotsna Singh

Let me also note that, while _EMC_ has a materialist editorial bias, we
encourage lively debate and will print responses from scholars of all
theoretical persuasions.

Best wishes,
David Siar

Re: Tudor Iconoclasm

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1491  Friday, 11 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Andrew W. White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 13:00:43 -0400
        Subj:   Tudor Iconoclasm

[2]     From:   Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 20:48:02 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1476 Re: Tudor Iconoclasm


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew W. White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 13:00:43 -0400
Subject:        Tudor Iconoclasm

Many thanks for the replies, both on and off-list.  And apologies for
not sharing the name of the presenter last time; my copy of the ATHE
conference program was temporarily in hiding, so now I can share more
information.  The presenter's name was Mark C. Pilkinton, from Note
Dame.  I believe he's been working from the archives in Bristol, UK, for
many years and he based his findings (which I summarized) to some degree
on what he found there.

He made mention that the pageant wagons were actually brought out once
or twice for special occasions, long after their occasional ban.  Not
sure what the circumstances were, but it's interesting that items like
these were kept in storage for years, instead of merely being
dismantled.

I'm all for further discussion, although my contributions would be of a
more Byzantine nature -- quotes from John of Damascus, i.e., "In the
word, heresy; in the image, truth."

Andrew White
Arlington, VA

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Aug 2000 20:48:02 -0400
Subject: 11.1476 Re: Tudor Iconoclasm
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1476 Re: Tudor Iconoclasm

Geralyn Horton asks:

>I for one would be interested in an on list exploration of this topic.
>Perferably, of couse, one carried on not as scholarly sharing of
>bibliographical info, but a discussion of what is known and what you who
>know it think it means.

The central figure in Huston Diehl's argument is John Foxe, the
martyrologist. Diehl argues that Foxe's Acts and Monuments is
paradigmatic for both its drama and its iconoclasm. Curiously she
doesn't note that Foxe himself was literally a dramatist, though not a
very successful one. Her argument seems to work best with those
dramatists who favor bloody or revenge tragedies, Webster, Kyd,
Middleton. In her fourth chapter, she notes the re-creation of
eucharistic controversies in The Spanish Tragedy, Women Beware Women,
and The Revenger's Tragedy. While I like her readings of Othello and
Hamlet, she doesn't give enough consideration to the arguments that
Shakespeare was a recusant Catholic.

One of Diehl's strongest comments, however, appears with a mention of
Midsummer's Night's Dream. Discussing the distinction of representation
and presentation as axiomatic for the early modern Protestant poetics of
drama:

"In observing a theatrical performance by an acting company such as the
Lord Chamberlain's Men, the spectators must recognize (as the
Mechanicals in *A Midsummer's Night's Dream* are so anxious to
demonstrate) that what they see is a representation, and not the literal
presence of what is represented. They must consciously accept the
illusory nature of theatrical images and yet believe in the figurative
truth of those very images." (Diehl, *Staging Reform, Reforming the
Stage*, 98).

I would argue that this statement can apply as well to Middleton and
Dekker's The Roaring Girl.

Jack Heller

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