2000

En-gendering 'The Tempest

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1455  Monday, 7 August 2000.

From:           Carol Light <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jul 2000 11:05:41 -0400
Subject: 11.1437 En-gendering 'The Tempest'
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1437 En-gendering 'The Tempest'

In June, I saw the Globe's Tempest with Vanessa Redgrave as part of
Joanne Walen's wonderful Shakespeare Express Stratford summerfest
(shameless plug).  We were a group of some 20 Shakespeare addicts, fans,
and scholars feasting on "an orgy of theatregoing", almost all
Shakespeare.

I think as a group, we were all puzzled at the choices made in the
Redgrave production.  She is a marvelous actress, absolutely magnetic on
the stage, and easily capable of imbuing the text with wonderful life.
She was an absolutely believable male, and while some thought that she
made Prospero's parenting of Miranda more tender and more
understandable, I at least couldn't puzzle out why it was done that way
(other than of course the star power she brought).

Which is not to say that there weren't gender issues in this production
-- there were, but they were certainly Ariel's.  Ariel began an
uniformed young man, costumed in a tunic and boots, being impish,
certainly, but almost entirely masculine.  As the play progressed, Ariel
got less masculine, more androgynous, and then, at the end, left the
stage dressed unmistakably as a young woman, went down among the
groundlings and left the theatre towards her own brave new world.

Carol Light

Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1454  Monday, 7 August 2000.

[1]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Jul 2000 17:01:23 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1436 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Douglas Chapman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 29 Jul 2000 11:57:04 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1436 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

[3]     From:   Michael Meyers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 Jul 2000 23:14:07 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1421 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Jul 2000 17:01:23 -0400
Subject: 11.1436 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1436 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

No, John,

In the traditional distinction between Art and Nature, Art is what
humans do, and Nature is what we are handed -- or, if you will, what we
don't do.  If a beaver builds a dam, it's natural; if a human builds a
dam, it artificial.  Simple.  And ridiculous, of course.  In any case,
using this artificial distinction, ideology is art.  As far as we know,
beavers do not construct ideologies.

And whatever could you mean by "Shakespearean value"?  Do you mean the
values (e.g., Shakespeare endorses dominant early English Christian
theology) that you impose on the texts that are attributed to
Shakespeare?  Or do you mean the value (i.e., worth) that you give to
those texts?  Or do you mean values that you construct from 400 year old
texts?  Etc.

Yours, Bill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Chapman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 29 Jul 2000 11:57:04 EDT
Subject: 11.1436 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1436 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

>From John Drakakis:

<...collapse 'art' into ideology or ideology into art you end up with a
sterile
<formalism which is pretty much where a lot of what passes for close
<reading of Shakespearean texts is and has been for quite some time.

Bravo, John. Succinct, to the point and what's even better, valid.

Thank you.
Douglas Chapman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Meyers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 Jul 2000 23:14:07 -0500
Subject: 11.1421 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1421 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

John E. Perry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> writes,

"Unless you're in the HR department, you really don't know what you're
talking about, and if you are, you're likely part of the Big Lie."

Gee John, this doesn't leave me much room.  I'm either a liar or I don't
know what I'm talking about.

But in spite of what you and Geralyn Horton may believe due to your
unique experiences [and I am sorry you have had trouble finding a job],
I am not a liar and I do indeed know what I am talking about.  While not
in HR, I have administered many 100's of salaries, hired countless
people, and done many audits of salaries of women and minorities vs.
white males.

Let's give this topic a rest!

Regards,
Michael

TOC: English Manuscript Studies, 1100-1700

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1452  Monday, 7 August 2000.

From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Jul 2000 14:09:59 -0500
Subject:        TOC: English Manuscript Studies, 1100-1700

English Manuscript Studies 1100-1700, Volume 8: Seventeenth-Century
Poetry, Music and Drama, ed. Peter Beal (British Library, London, 2000)

HILTON KELLIHER, Francis Beaumont and Nathan Field: New Records of their
Early Years. 1-42

MARK BLAND, `As far from all Reuolt': Sir John Salusbury, Christ Church
MS 184 and Ben Jonson's First Ode. 43-78

JAMES KNOWLES, The `Running Masque' Recovered: A Masque for the Marquess
of Buckingham (c.1619-20). 79-135

JEREMY MAULE, `To the memory of the late excellent Poet John Fletcher':
A New Poem by John Ford. 136-159

PETER BEAL, An Authorial Collection of Poems by Thomas Carew: The Gower
Manuscript. 160-185

SCOTT NIXON, The Manuscript Sources of Thomas Carew's Poetry. 186-224

RICHARD CHARTERIS, A Newly Discovered Songbook in Poland with Works by
Henry Lawes and his Contemporaries. 225-279

DENNIS FLYNN, Donne Manuscripts in Cheshire

KEITH WALKER, `Not the Worst part of my wretched life': Three New
Letters by Rochester, and How to Read Them. 293-299

NICHOLAS FISHER, A New Dating of Rochester's Artemiza to Chloe. 300-319.

English Manuscript Studies 1100-1700 Volume 9: Writings by Early Modern
Women, ed. Peter Beal and Margaret J.M. Ezell (British Library, London,
2000)

JANE STEVENSON, Writing and Scribal Publication in the Sixteenth
Century. 1-32

FRANCES TEAGUE, Princess Elizabeth's Hand in The Glass of the Sinful
Soul. 33-48

ANNEKE TJAN-BAKKER, Dame Flora's Blossoms: Esther Inglis's
Flower-Illustrated Manuscripts.  49-72

GEORGIANNA ZIEGLER, Hand-Ma[I]de Books: The Manuscripts of Esther
Inglis, Early-Modern Precursors of the Artists' Book. 73-87

STEVEN W. MAY, Two Unpublished Letters by Mary Herbert, Countess of
Pembroke. 88-97

VICTORIA E. BURKE, Elizabeth Ashburnham Richardson's `Motherlie
Endeauors'. 98-113

MARGARET HANNAY, Elizabeth Ashburnham Richardson's Meditation on the
Countess of Pembroke's Discourse. 114-128

SYLVIA BROWN, The Approbation of Elizabeth Jocelin. 129-164

JEAN KLENE, `Monuments of an Endless affection': Folger MS V.b.198 and
Lady Anne Southwell. 165-186.

HEATHER WOLFE, The Scribal Hands and Dating of Lady Falkland: Her Life.
187

TOC: ELR 30, no. 2

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1453  Monday, 7 August 2000.

From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Jul 2000 14:11:42 -0500
Subject:        TOC: ELR 30, no. 2

ELR:

Subtitle of Spring 2000 issue:  Re-Contextualizing Shakespeare

Contents:

Michael Torrye, "'The plain devil and dissembling looks': Ambivalent
Physignomy and Shakespeare's _Richard III_"

Christ Fitter, "'The quarrel is between our masters and us their men':
_Romeo and Juliet_, Dearth, and the London Riots"

Philip D. Collington, "'I Would Thy Husband Were Dead': _The Merry Wives
of Windsor_ as Mock Domestic Tragedy"

Ken Jackson, "'I know not/ Where I did lodge last night?" _King Lear_
and the Search for Bethlem (Bedlam) Hospital"

Ian Munro, "The City and Its Double:  Plague Time in Early Modern
London"

Susannah Brietz Monta, "'Thou fall'st a blessed martyr': Shakespeare's
_Henry VIII_ and the Polemics of Conscience"

Valerie Traub, "Recent Studies in Homoeroticism"

Submitted by
Elizabeth H. Hageman
July 28, 2000

RORD--TOC and New Editor

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1451  Monday, 7 August 2000.

From:           Peter Greenfield <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Jul 2000 11:25:15 -0700
Subject:        RORD--TOC and New Editor

This summer I have taken over from David Bergeron as editor of RESEARCH
OPPORTUNITIES IN RENAISSANCE DRAMA, and beginning with the 2001 issue
the journal will be published at the University of Puget Sound.
Manuscripts and subscription payments should be sent to me at the
Department of English, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA  98416,
USA.  (Note: Paid-up members of the Medieval and Renaissance Drama
Society will continue to receive RORD as a benefit of their
membership.)  Reports and reviews of Renaissance drama productions
should still be sent to Dr. Elizabeth Schafer, Department of Drama and
Theatre Studies, Royal Holloway College, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX,
ENGLAND.  Reports  on medieval drama productions should be sent to me at
the above address, or via e-mail at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The RORD web page gives information on submissions and subscriptions,
tables of  contents for current and upcoming volumes, and contains
photographs of productions reviewed in the journal.  See it at
http://www.ups.edu/faculty/greenfield/rord.html

Table of contents for the 2000 issue, vol. 39:




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