2000

Re: Romeo is Bleeding

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1596  Monday, 28 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Aug 2000 13:07:20 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding

[2]     From:   Robert J. Matter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Aug 2000 12:09:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding

[3]     From:   Jimmy Jung  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Aug 2000 13:53:34 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding

[4]     From:   Michael Harrawood <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Aug 2000 14:34:56 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding

[5]     From:   Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 26 Aug 2000 18:45:53 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 2000 13:07:20 -0400
Subject: 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding

You got the plot right.  There is no Shakespeare reference in the film.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert J. Matter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 2000 12:09:35 -0500
Subject: 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding

No Shakespeare content but good noir nonetheless.

Bob Matter
Hammond, Indiana

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jimmy Jung  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 2000 13:53:34 -0400
Subject: 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding

Romeo is bleeding is either amazing or overwrought, depending on who you
ask.  It has nothing to do with Shakespeare and lots to do with film
noir or attempted film nor (depending on who you ask).  Gary Oldman
plays a crooked cop exactly as you would expect him, but being from the
group who thinks highly of the film, I believe its highlight is Lena
Olin as Mona Demarkov, one of the greatest screen villains I can think
of.  No, I have no explanation for the title.

As always www.imdb.com is a great source for more info.

Jimmy

I'm not asking you to kill him; I'm asking you to bury him. If he dies
in the process, that's his problem.  -Mona Demarkov

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Harrawood <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 2000 14:34:56 -0400
Subject: 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding

Jeff,

The title Romeo is Bleeding is from a Tom Waits song.  I thought the
film was great, with Lena Olin in a particularly demonic role.

Michael Harrawood

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 26 Aug 2000 18:45:53 EDT
Subject: 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1583 Romeo is Bleeding

Dunno about the film but there's a damn brilliant Tom Waits song of the
same name on his Blue Valentine album circa 1977...check it out the man
is God.  (Waits I mean).

Re: Cymbeline

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1595  Monday, 28 August 2000.

From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 2000 12:26:59 -0400
Subject:        Cymbeline

David Kathman is right.  The fact that Sir Frank Kermode makes the same
point immediately establishes its validity. Phew! For a moment there I
thought I was in trouble.  Edward Pixley, however, is not right. Ros
King described the writing in 'Cymbeline' as 'wonderfully sharp' and
'polished'.  Pixley seems to think he's defending her by admitting,
oddly, that some of it (deliberately) isn't. This turns out to be a
development of the stunning argument that whenever the language ISN'T
sharp and polished, that's when it most subtly IS. (We presentists
deftly term this 'having it both ways').  As an alternative, may I point
out, subject to endorsement from on high of course, that it's perfectly
evident that the main function of the 'Gentlemen' at the beginning of
the play is exposition, not the characterisation of a court culture. Yet
even their opening lines end up gnarled and contorted:

        You do not meet a man but frowns. Our bloods
        No more obey the heavens than our courtiers
        Still seem as does the King.
        (1. 1. 1-3)

'Wonderfully sharp'? 'Polished'?  I know my place, but Sir Frank shall
hear of this.

T. Hawkes

Brandon and the Stationer's Register

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1593  Friday, 25 August 2000.

From:           Yvonne Bruce <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 2000 09:51:14 -0400
Subject:        Brandon and the Stationer's Register

Can anyone on the listserv tell me how to access the Stationer's
Register online, if that's possible? All I've found to this point are
links from various websites to Register entries I'm not interested in.

Two more related questions: I'm doing research on various Tudor Roman
plays, Shakespeare's and others. Right now I'm rereading Samuel
Brandon's *The Virtuous Octavia*, in which Octavia remarks in great
detail on her husband before Antony, Marcellus. I've found just one line
in Plutarch that mentions her widowhood. Does Brandon perhaps have
another source for this information? Then, at another point early in
this closet drama, Octavia forestalls conflict between her brother and
Antony at Tarentum by standing in between them on the battlefield. It
seems clear that Brandon got some of the language of this scene from
Plutarch's *Life of Antony*, but what about the action? Has anyone heard
of Octavia's doing this?

Thanks in advance to all,
Yvonne Bruce

Re: Elizabeth Rex

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1594  Friday, 25 August 2000.

From:           Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 2000 10:54:23 EDT
Subject: 11.1578 Re: Elizabeth Rex
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1578 Re: Elizabeth Rex

It's booked for the season. I'm headed to Stratford and will have to
settle for Shakespeare and Wilde. Now, there's a confrontation! Have
they yet met onstage?

Electronic Sources

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1592  Friday, 25 August 2000.

From:           Michael Harrawood <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Aug 2000 09:47:40 -0400
Subject:        Electronic Sources

Dear Shaksperists,

My school, Florida Atlantic University, is about to acquire the EEBO
database from Bell & Howell, I think on a trial basis.

I am wondering whether anybody out there has used this or any of the
other online databases (such as Chadwick Healy) in the classroom.  I
would be interested in any advice, war stories, or anything helpful
regarding the use of these sources in teaching.

With thanks in advance,
Michael Harrawood
Jupiter, FL

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.