2000

Re: Tudor Iconoclasm

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1556  Tuesday, 22 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Aug 2000 12:29:26 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1547 Re: Tudor Iconoclasm

[2]     From:   Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Aug 2000 20:02:45 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1547 Re: Tudor Iconoclasm


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 2000 12:29:26 -0400
Subject: 11.1547 Re: Tudor Iconoclasm
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1547 Re: Tudor Iconoclasm

Dear Clifford Stetner:

The problem with your chronology, as with most quickly surmised
"evolutionary" theories of developments in drama, is A) that the
"morality" plays, as we call them, are a different genre of drama from
the so-called "mystery plays."  [Look for the heirs of the mysteries in
Shakespeare's history plays, not in Tudor moralities, whether Puritan or
not] and B) the chronology is wrong anyway.  Sixteenth century EVERYMAN,
it is commonly known, is a translation from a Dutch play; MANKIND was
almost certainly written in the fifteenth century, and while WISDOM is
later than usually thought (probably an early Tudor play), it was
without question written before the end of the fifteenth century,
probably in the 1480s.  You might want to take a look at the chronology
and discussion of genre in my edition of WISDOM [THE PLAY OF WISDOM:
ITS TEXTS AND CONTEXTS, AMS Press, 1999], but there are also tons of
other materials that focus on this chronology; the earliest and still
one of the best David Bevington's FROM MANKIND TO MARLOWE.  [By the by,
THE CASTLE OF PERSEVERANCE may, as is commonly thought, have been
written as early as 1425; I'm not too sure about that date, but it's a
possibility.]

I'd suggest that you look before you leap into making assumptions about
cause and effect.

Best,
Milla Riggio

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 2000 20:02:45 -0400
Subject: 11.1547 Re: Tudor Iconoclasm
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1547 Re: Tudor Iconoclasm

Clifford Stetner wrote:

>Besides Ben Jonson, I think it would also be instructive (for both
>questions of arteology and iconoclasm) to trace the progression from
>Catholic mystery plays to Puritan morality plays.

Something of this progression is developed in Paul Whitfield White's
monograph *Theatre and Reformation: Protestantism, Patronage, and
Playing Tudor England* (Cambridge UP, 1993). Among the playwrights White
discusses is John Bale. Since it has been some time since I read White's
text, I don't remember what he says of Bale's play *King Johan.*
However, a contrast between Bale's play and Shakespeare's *King John*
might plausibly be informed by attention to John Foxe's hagiography of
King John and his iconoclasm. Has any study been done on Foxe and
Shakespeare?

Jack Heller

Re: LLL on Video

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1555  Tuesday, 22 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Aug 2000 12:01:54 -0400
        Subj:   Re: LLL on Video

[2]     From:   Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Aug 2000 11:54:23 +1000
        Subj:   Titus and LLL: Australian release?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 2000 12:01:54 -0400
Subject:        Re: LLL on Video

Dear Billy,

Wonder no longer.  Love's Labour's Lost is currently estimated for a
December 2000 release on video (high rental price, probably dropping to
affordability in June 2001) and regular price DVD.

I'm told by Branagh's office that the DVD will contain all manner of
missing scenes, extras and what-have-you.

Tanya Gough
Poor Yorick Shakespeare Multimedia Catalogue

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Aug 2000 11:54:23 +1000
Subject:        Titus and LLL: Australian release?

Does anyone on the list know whether the recent Taymor Titus and Branagh
LLL have been released in Australia (did I somehow miss them?). Or
anything about any plans to release them?

Peter Groves
Department of English
Monash University, Melbourne

Q on 1955 Brook Titus Andronicus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1553  Tuesday, 22 August 2000.

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 2000 11:35:32 -0400
Subject:        Q on 1955 Brook Titus Andronicus

I have read that the 1955 Brook production of Titus Andronicus makes
reference to the Holocaust. Does anyone happen to know more about this
aspect of the production?  Alan Dessen does not discuss it in his book
on the play.

Re: The Globe Upside Down

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1554  Tuesday, 22 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Paul Nelsen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Aug 2000 11:56:45 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1548 The Globe Upside Down

[2]     From:   Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Aug 2000 19:05:06 EDT
        Subj:   Re: The Globe Upside Down and Gerald Freedman


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Nelsen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 2000 11:56:45 -0400
Subject: 11.1548 The Globe Upside Down
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1548 The Globe Upside Down

Thanks to Sam Small for his comments on the New Globe's production of
"The Antipodes or The World Upside Down written by Richard Brome, Ben
Jonson's manservant, around 1620." Brome may have served Jonson in 1620,
but he wrote THE ANTIPODES in 1636.

Paul Nelsen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 2000 19:05:06 EDT
Subject: 11.1548 The Globe Upside Down and Gerald Freedman
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1548 The Globe Upside Down and Gerald Freedman

Freedman is one of the great Shakespearean directors.  I've seen a Romeo
and Juliet he did at SUNY Purchase a Loves Labors Lost with the Acting
Company and a few others.  He's deliciously detailed in the
moment-by-moment vigor of his staging and the intelligence he brings out
in his actors.  Ooooh, I wish I could zip to London.  Not this year,

Steve Ur-fan-owitz

Re: Contentville

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1552  Tuesday, 22 August 2000.

[1]     From:   Sarah Werner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Aug 2000 10:43:44 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1544 FYI Contentville

[2]     From:   Christopher Warley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Aug 2000 10:44:40 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1544 FYI Contentville


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sarah Werner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 2000 10:43:44 -0400
Subject: 11.1544 FYI Contentville
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1544 FYI Contentville

Before consulting a lawyer, check out UMI's website (www.umi.com) and
the information they give about copyrights and royalties. I remember
seeing a notice that they pay royalties only when seven or more copies
are ordered in a year. I'm pretty sure this is their standard contract
that all of us agreed to when we gave them permission to distribute our
dissertations (if you never gave them permission, of course, that's a
different story). I don't think a lawyer can do anything about this. For
those of you very interested in the big scandal surrounding
Contentville, however, look at the  ongoing discussion at
www.slashdot.org

Sarah Werner

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christopher Warley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Aug 2000 10:44:40 -0400
Subject: 11.1544 FYI Contentville
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1544 FYI Contentville

Please do keep us informed of the developments of such an interesting
problem.  It should certainly be an enlightening experience for anyone
trying to understand developments in intellectual property, and property
generally, in the Renaissance and later.

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