2000

Soap Bard

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1445  Friday, 28 July 2000.

From:           Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 20:46:37 -0400
Subject:        Soap Bard

Guiding Light used a speech from "Antony and Cleopatra" in a
honeymooners' love scene today. The  handsome Prince Richard (that's the
soap character)started with "Age cannot wither her..." and  proceeded to
melt his lady with "Oh wither hast thou led me, Egypt" up to "Give me a
kiss, even this repays me."

Worked well.

Re: TOC

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1444  Friday, 28 July 2000.

From:           Ian Munro <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 12:03:57 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: 11.1431 TOC
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1431 TOC

Dennis Taylor wrote:

>I use Uncover, which is great.
>
>But is there a way to have just published book titles, on selected
>subjects, also delivered by internet?

Uncover has a new option which will send you book titles that match
selected keywords.  The other thing worth doing is going to the
Associated American University Presses website; they have a mailing list
and will send you a weekly (?) digest of recent publications by
university presses in various fields.

Ian Munro

Re: BBC

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1442  Friday, 28 July 2000.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 09:20:26 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1419 BBC Again

[2]     From:   Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 23:56:49 +0100
        Subj:   Big Brotherly Consideration - The BBC


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 09:20:26 -0700
Subject: 11.1419 BBC Again
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1419 BBC Again

On the subject of the BBC monopoly over video productions of certain
plays, I'm wondering whether their monopoly pricing might make it
worthwhile for anyone to make new productions of complete tetralogies.

This would not only provide us with a choice, but might also tempt them
into releasing their own versions more cheaply.

Any takers?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 23:56:49 +0100
Subject:        Big Brotherly Consideration - The BBC

John Cox wrote:

It's not clear to me why their charges remain so exorbitant, especially
since the BBC is a public corporation, partly funded by the government.

You have my sympathies, John.  The Broadcasting Corporation (radio and
two TV channels) are wholly funded by British taxation (called a
"television receiving apparatus" licence - $160 per year).  Americans
may not know this - the BBC employ thousands of "detector vans" equipped
with special aerials (antenna) that roam the streets to snoop on viewers
who are watching TV without a "TV licence".  It gets worse.  Even if you
never watch the BBC channels you can still be prosecuted for not having
a TV licence.  (Refuse to pay it and they'll send you to prison - it has
happened.)  But there is even more.  In the UK there are only three
agencies that can forcibly enter your premises without a court order.
The first is Inland Revenue, the second VAT (indirect taxation
gathering) and the third? - you guessed it - the TV detector man.  Man,
it's the stuff of Shakespeare's nightmares!

SAM

_Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies_

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1443  Friday, 28 July 2000.

From:           Bruce Boehrer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 14:00:11 -0400
Subject:        _Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies_

The _Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies_ (_JEMCS_) is a new
scholarly publication that to one degree or another embraces all of the
categories of study listed below.  A semiannual journal, it's scheduled
for an inaugural issue in March 2001.  JEMCS has been founded as the
journal of record for the Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies, which
is now in its eighth year of promoting the broadest possible range of
cultural-studies scholarship in the period from the late fifteenth to
the late nineteenth centuries; familiarity with regular GEMCS conference
proceedings will give one a pretty good sense of what the journal's
interested in publishing.  The first issues will contain the following
articles, among others:

Gary Taylor, "Gender and Hunger in Middleton's _The Bloody Banquet_"
(examines the play's juxtaposition of gender and digestive tropes)
Scott Oldenburg, "England's National Family Romance" (explores early
modern theories of racial difference from the psychoanalytic
vantage-point)
Carol L. Sherman, "_Aboli bibelot_: Ourika, Portrait of Melancholy"
(reads the work of Claire de Duras from the standpoint of contemporary
developments in the treatment of mental illness)
Gordon Sayre, "The Mammoth: Endangered Species or Vanishing Race?"
(discusses seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century nature
writing and its  speculations on the extinction of the woolly mammoth)

We're working on a website that should be at least minimally operational
within a month or so.  The URL is http://www.fsu.edu/jemcs.  Editorial
offices are housed in the Department of English, Florida State
University.  E-mail enquiries to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Bruce Boehrer

Poem from Much Ado About Nothing

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1441  Friday, 28 July 2000.

From:           Peter Webster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 09:52:03 EDT
Subject:        Poem from Much Ado About Nothing

Here is something a bit awry, but charming: a piecemeal poem assembled
from MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. I came across it again in a dog-eared
uncorrected advance proof of The Best American Poetry, 1991.

BENEDICK'S COMPLAINTS
by Gary Mitchner

Burn my study for it holds no friends.
Who says one fathers the self for others?
Remember, Lady Disdain cannot die for you.
Courteous turncoats love women's happiness.
After sober custom who scratches the tongue?
Sighing away Sundays, put on a suspicious cap.
Savage bulls too often fall from faith.
Heavenly tuition's paid for hard lessons.
Twisting fine stories, the present practice.
Hearing of reason we use discontent as a muzzle.
Apes in hell likewise betrothed to unquiet.
The cook's mind filled with earth like supper.
Valiant dust no longer dances out answers.
Impossible slanderers eat the fool's partridge.
Hearts with tongues can always sell bullocks.
Silent heralds steal mirth and matter from all.
Dancing stars come on time's last crutches.
Argument and scorn soil this fantastic banquet.
Sheep from men's bodies counterfeit passion.
The hit fox devours tender blood like oysters.
There's fear and trembling in Messina.
Trust expectations, sport of the sadly born.
Mend distractions with paper brains, paper bullets.
Pain's message runs like fish after bait.
Consuming wrong becomes Cupid's trap.
The taming hand starts fire in the ear.
Sad money like a sighing ache is fancy's disguise.
Deaf hobbyhorses at cold midnight face upward.
Hanging dogs bark out man's shame and reproach.
Behind the horse one cannot find wantonness.
Every luxurious bed holds unknown loins.
Gone through here, Count Conflict condemns.
Recorded as an ass, he received no burial.
Caring cats, we refuse to see the doctor ape.
Hard words will not grow into a rhyming plant.
Sir God, please stop dealing in bruised hope.

Peter Webster

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