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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: July ::
Re: BBC
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1442  Friday, 28 July 2000.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 09:20:26 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1419 BBC Again

[2]     From:   Sam Small <
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        Date:   Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 23:56:49 +0100
        Subj:   Big Brotherly Consideration - The BBC


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 09:20:26 -0700
Subject: 11.1419 BBC Again
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1419 BBC Again

On the subject of the BBC monopoly over video productions of certain
plays, I'm wondering whether their monopoly pricing might make it
worthwhile for anyone to make new productions of complete tetralogies.

This would not only provide us with a choice, but might also tempt them
into releasing their own versions more cheaply.

Any takers?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <
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Date:           Thursday, 27 Jul 2000 23:56:49 +0100
Subject:        Big Brotherly Consideration - The BBC

John Cox wrote:

It's not clear to me why their charges remain so exorbitant, especially
since the BBC is a public corporation, partly funded by the government.

You have my sympathies, John.  The Broadcasting Corporation (radio and
two TV channels) are wholly funded by British taxation (called a
"television receiving apparatus" licence - $160 per year).  Americans
may not know this - the BBC employ thousands of "detector vans" equipped
with special aerials (antenna) that roam the streets to snoop on viewers
who are watching TV without a "TV licence".  It gets worse.  Even if you
never watch the BBC channels you can still be prosecuted for not having
a TV licence.  (Refuse to pay it and they'll send you to prison - it has
happened.)  But there is even more.  In the UK there are only three
agencies that can forcibly enter your premises without a court order.
The first is Inland Revenue, the second VAT (indirect taxation
gathering) and the third? - you guessed it - the TV detector man.  Man,
it's the stuff of Shakespeare's nightmares!

SAM
 

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