2000

Reveal and TOCs

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1425  Wednesday, 26 July 2000.

From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 20 Jul 2000 17:26:45 -0500
Subject:        Reveal and TOCs

Colleagues,

For more data on TOCs, you may be able to turn to Reveal, a
subscription-only service that allows downloading many TOCS but not
redistributing them on listservs. Rules cited to me by my English
librarian at UT are such as follows:

=====

Hello Frank,

We do subscribe to Reveal (see http://www.lib.utexas.edu/reveal/ for
more info), but it looks like their license agreement prohibits posting
search results to listservs--your results can only be redistributed
within UT-Austin, which has purchased a site license.

To quote:

Users of this service agree to the following conditions:

1. Tables of contents or results of searches may not be redistributed
outside of the organization named on the order form, and may not be
posted to public listservers or bulletin boards.

2. Access to TOC Redistribution search results by non-affiliated remote
users is not permitted.

3. TOC Redistribution search results may not be retained longer than one
month without UnCover's explicit written permission.

4. Organizations may not re-sell TOC Redistribution data or search
results without UnCover's explicit written permission.

etc.

=====

At any rate, you might check to see if your institution subscribes.

Frank Whigham

TOCs and the SHAKSPER listserv

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1424  Wednesday, 26 July 2000.

From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Jul 2000 09:44:51 -0500
Subject:        TOCs and the SHAKSPER listserv

Dear Colleagues,

I'm writing to ask for your help or advice. (Various colleagues have
suggested your names to me; I'd welcome further suggestions for
contacts.)

I'm in the process of helping to arrange to post regularly to the
Shakespeare Listserv (SHAKSPER) the Tables-of-Contents lists for all
journals publishing articles that have relevance to any of the following
fields of study (an awkward and partial list, no doubt, to which I'd be
happy to add):

  -- Shakespeare
  -- Renaissance (dramatic and non-dramatic, literary and non-literary)
  -- early modern English history in the broadest sense: for the British
Isles, colonial ventures, continental matters that would tie in with
early modern England, etc.
  -- the continental Renaissance as it relates to England
  -- the arts in early modern England: visual arts, music, etc.
  -- theatrical and performance studies that link to early modern
England
  -- the English Reformation

It helps our readers, and would give the journals free publicity. It
seems like a good idea all around.

So. Would you be willing to make arrangements to supply via email the
TOCs (ideally, for each issue) of the relevant journals to which you may
be connected? Alternatively, can you offer advice or data in making such
arrangements, if you're unable to do the actual delivery yourself? If
so, let me know, and we can talk further. I'd appreciate any help of any
kind you can offer. (If you have other names to suggest for contact, an
email address would help a great deal.) I am especially interested in
bridging the gaps at the edges of Shakespeare studies as traditionally
conceived.

Please feel free to forward this letter.

Please also pardon this mass mailing, and any multiple messages
received.  I've sometimes used two addresses for one person when there
were two, in case you're away on vacation.

Many thanks.

Frank Whigham

Re: Shakespeare as Bible

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1422  Wednesday, 26 July 2000.

From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Jul 2000 16:29:22 -0400
Subject: 11.1413 Re: Shakespeare as Bible
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1413 Re: Shakespeare as Bible

Sean Lawrence writes:

>Actually, I brought it up, and I think that our different narrative
>frameworks are part of the problem.  I was borrowing it from a story
>recorded by Stephen Hawking, which doesn't involve a shaman, but an
>interlocutor at a public lecture.

As I recall, Carl Sagan introduces A Brief History of Time, and he
rather than Hawking tells the delightful tale of the turtles.  The
interlocutor is an elderly woman: "Young man, it's turtles all the way
down."  I have not checked the text.  I may be completely wrong.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

Re: Play-ing Reality (was Exploitation, Marx,

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1423  Wednesday, 26 July 2000.

From:           Geralyn Horton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Jul 2000 13:31:32 -0400
Subject:        Re: Play-ing Reality (was Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare)

Michael Meyers says he can
>only wonder in amazement
>at where people like you get this distorted view of   [the "in computers"] reality.

I "got" it the way I get on most hobby-horses: from noticing that there
is a dramatic disjunction between1) the popular image-- geeks, nerdy
losers, mad scientists, wizards 2) the image promoted by the business
media-- vital components in Global Competition, in short supply, valued
for both steady accomplishment and creativity, and rewarded accordingly;
and 3) the careers of 3 generations of my family and friends in "the
field" over 40 years.

Where there is such a disjunction there should be material for drama.  I
do preliminary research dramatist fashion, looking not for confirmation
of a single POV, but for meaningful internal and external conflict:
Articles such as those featured in the Dec 1999 American Prospect, for
instance.  Certain things jump out as human embodiments of unassimilated
statistics describing How It Is-- "20 years after graduation only 7% of
Computer Science majors are still working in the field" connects to "No
one on the team who were the heroes of Tracey Kidder's THE SOUL OF A NEW
MACHINE (a book I read with admiration Back When) is still working in C
D/P".  I search hoping that this material will please the Muse and she
will send a hint of how it can be wrought into a play-- perhaps
something like Jane Anderson's meditation on Christa MacAuliffe and the
space program, DEFYING GRAVITY?  When the Muse proves stubbornly silent,
I throw my notes and xeroxes into a shoe box and stash them in the
basement, along with my other "distorted views" that so far have refused
to assemble themselves into plots that show some promise of working out
with a degree of truth and beauty. Wish I knew a better way -- wish I
knew how Shakespeare juggled distortions, or how he went about
activating his Muse (pace Stoppard). But, please, Michael: keep
pontificating.  My Muse, somnolent when plied with statistics,
sometimes flies into unexpected action when roused by Fighting Words.

Geralyn Horton, Playwright
Newton, Mass. 02460
<http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton>

Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1421  Wednesday, 26 July 2000.

[1]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Jul 2000 13:22:27 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 11.1398 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Jul 2000 16:34:55 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1414 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

[3]     From:   John E. Perry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Jul 2000 00:03:31 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1414 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Jul 2000 13:22:27 -0400
Subject: Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare
Comment:        SHK 11.1398 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

Belinda Johnston cries, 'TERENCE HAWKES WHERE ARE YOU?'

Mike Jensen wonders, 'Who knows, maybe even Shakespeare will reenter the
conversation'

Courage! You drag it from me, but I have been modestly preparing for the
publication of a new volume in the 'Accents on Shakespeare' series.
Matchlessly edited by Jean Howard and Scott Shershow,  it is called
MARXIST SHAKESPEARES.  It will be available from your local bookstore in
October.  Sophie Masson will need several copies.

Terence Hawkes

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Jul 2000 16:34:55 -0400
Subject: 11.1414 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1414 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

>> The opposite of ideology is not passivity, but
>> art, in which I include many things, incidentally, and not just formal
>> art. It includes such things as ceremony, folklore, traditions, etc.

What we need is a more abstract definition of "art."  If one
discriminates between art and nature, isn't an ideology a work of art?

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John E. Perry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Jul 2000 00:03:31 -0400
Subject: 11.1414 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1414 Re: Exploitation, Marx, and Shakespeare

Michael Myers writes,

> Geralyn, your view of my industry from afar is far different than the
> view I have close up.   I personally know of 1000's of open job in my
> company alone, with starting salaries more than triple what you quote
> above.

Unless you're in the HR department, you really don't know what you're
talking about, and if you are, you're likely part of the Big Lie.  I'm a
56-year-old engineer, thoroughly experienced in computer hardware and
software, who has spent 13 months out of the last 4 years trying to find
jobs -- even as a temp.  I'm now working for 25% less than I made four
years ago, in a job for which I'm grossly overqualified.

And the 200+ resumes I sent out went to advertisements that seemed to be
copies of my resume.

Now I'll drop the matter, and go back to eavesdropping.

John Perry
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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