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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: June ::
Re: Senile Dementia
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1184  Thursday, 8 June 2000.

[1]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Jun 2000 10:29:56 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1161 Re: Senile Dementia

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Jun 2000 12:18:13 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 11.1180 Re: Senile Dementia


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Wednesday, 7 Jun 2000 10:29:56 -0400
Subject: 11.1161 Re: Senile Dementia
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1161 Re: Senile Dementia

>there is an old legend ... that Shakespeare specialized in playing old men-
> --Ed Taft

I read it; I don't remember by whom.  But Shakespeare certainly "plays"
and old man in the sonnets (and perhaps the old man in the Lover's
Complaint), although I don't think he was any older than I when he wrote
them.

And for Annalisa Castaldo who says:

> What interests me most is how often mothers are absent from the stage.

I'm not sure if it is relevant, but it similarly amazes me how little
part "some mother" plays in the first seventeen "procreation" sonnets.

Clifford Stetner

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Wednesday, 7 Jun 2000 12:18:13 -0400
Subject: Re: Senile Dementia
Comment:        SHK 11.1180 Re: Senile Dementia


Gabriel Egan writes

'"In its own time" implies consideration of the historical specificity
of the work, presumably with respect to things like the conditions of
its construction, early performance, and reception. Can that construct
(i.e. the play in relation to the world which produced it) be said to
exist in the present, as implied by the use of the present tense of the
verb "to be"? It seems that "in its own time" offers an historicist
perspective which the sentence backs away from in using "is". Would it
be unfair to suggest that "in its own time" is drained of its positivism
by "is" (which denies that the past is a done deed), but only at the
cost of anachronism?

Yes.

Terence Hawkes
 

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