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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: June ::
Re: Article of Interest
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1196  Friday, 9 June 2000.

[1]     From:   Jack Heller <
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        Date:   Thursday, 08 Jun 2000 10:59:30 -0400
        Subj:   Article of Interest

[2]     From:   Harvey Wheeler <
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        Date:   Thursday, 8 Jun 2000 09:50:09 -0700
        Subj:   Article of Interest

[3]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Thursday, 8 Jun 2000 18:44:49 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1172 Re: Article of Interest

[4]     From:   Patrick Buckridge <
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        Date:   Friday, 09 Jun 2000 13:40:25 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1188 Re: Article of Interest


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <
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Date:           Thursday, 08 Jun 2000 10:59:30 -0400
Subject:        Article of Interest

While the broad questioning of Shakespeare as author is uninteresting to
me, I think a comprehensive study of his collaborations and of other
authors' hands in his works would be very timely and useful.

Jack Heller

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harvey Wheeler <
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Date:           Thursday, 8 Jun 2000 09:50:09 -0700
Subject:        Article of Interest

Have there been computer-text comparison analyses of the writings of
others who have been candidate authors of Shakespeare?

Harvey Wheeler

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[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Thursday, 8 Jun 2000 18:44:49 EDT
Subject: 11.1172 Re: Article of Interest
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1172 Re: Article of Interest

Richard Nathan wonders about a display at the "Old Globe" in London
showing that Shakespeare wrote Shakespeare.  I assume he refers to the
new Globe, Shakespeare's Globe.  I was there yesterday, and went through
the exhibition pretty carefully--the only exhibit on authorship is a
wall card that gives a column each to supporters of Marlowe, Bacon, and
DeVere to make their case.

I won't spend much space on *The Tempest*, except that Vanessa Redgrave
is a remarkably hapless Prospero, and if you can't get tickets you ain't
missed much.

Dave Evett

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patrick Buckridge <
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Date:           Friday, 09 Jun 2000 13:40:25 +1000
Subject: 11.1188 Re: Article of Interest
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1188 Re: Article of Interest

Having withdrawn from the list four or five years ago when it was made
clear that discussion of the authorship question was not welcome, I was
a little surprised to discover, on my first day back in the fold, that
it hadn't gone away after all! (And brought back by a compatriot!)

For the record, although I thought the 'ban' was a bit rich at the time,
I now think that it was the right decision. It's pointless and
time-wasting to argue endlessly about first premises - much better
(IMHO) to split off into smaller groupings who can at least agree that
there IS an authorship question (and that it's interesting!) and to
proceed from there. Which is pretty much what happened back then.

So I don't particularly want to engage in any 'first order' authorship
discussion on SHAKSPER.  Hardy seems prepared to tolerate 'second order'
discussion, but since this encourages people to say that what doesn't
happen to interest them is ipso facto of no interest or importance to
the world, maybe that tolerance is not such a good idea. However, the
'what difference would it make?' question has been well answered by
Larry Weiss.  Of course a definite alternative identification would make
a difference!  For various reasons, I don't think there's likely to be
one in the near future, if ever; but in the meantime it might be worth
cultivating an attitude of sceptical open-mindedness about all authorial
identifications (including that of the Stratford man).  Works for me!

Anyway, like every other non-Stratfordian I've met, I'm interested in
other aspects of Shakespeare too, which is why I've rejoined the list.
Looking forward to the daily fix.

Pat Buckridge
 

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