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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: June ::
Re: Pedagogy: Course Structure
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1272  Friday, 23 June 2000.

[1]     From:   Pat Dolan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 22 Jun 2000 08:51:27 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1263 Re: Pedagogy: Course Structure

[2]     From:   Susan C Oldrieve <
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        Date:   Thursday, 22 Jun 2000 14:09:21 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1263 Re: Pedagogy: Course Structure


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Dolan <
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Date:           Thursday, 22 Jun 2000 08:51:27 -0500
Subject: 11.1263 Re: Pedagogy: Course Structure
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1263 Re: Pedagogy: Course Structure

On 6/22/00 8:00 AM, L. Swilley wrote:

> This method is entirely formal, of course, and based on the assumption
> that the characters and plot require no historical gloss for the
> comprehension of the deepest, most human (therefore most constant and
> most important) elements of the play.  It is the method of examination
> used by directors and actors, who cannot, should not  depend on their
> audiences' historical knowledge of the play, but must touch down in them
> to find all that is immortally human.

What do you do with students who believe (I'd say "know," but that would
be tendentious wouldn't it?) that the deepest, most human truth about us
is that we are historically and culturally situated? (Please notice that
I did not say "determined" and flame something other than straw men.)

Do you let your students assume, for example, that "presently" means "by
and by"?

Genuinely curious,
Patrick

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan C Oldrieve <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 22 Jun 2000 14:09:21 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 11.1263 Re: Pedagogy: Course Structure
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1263 Re: Pedagogy: Course Structure

I really liked L. Swilley's pedagogy for teaching the one and only
Shakespeare course at the University.  I think the detailed, slow and
steady approach builds confidence and a deep understanding of how the
plays are constructed and can convey meaning. But I had one question.

The description made it clear what was done with the 4 plays intensively
studied in class.  What is done with the other 8 assigned as out of
class reading?

Susan Oldrieve
Baldwin-Wallace College
 

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