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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: June ::
Re: Antony Sher's Macbeth
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1310  Thursday, 29 June 2000.

[1]     From:   Jaysinh Birjepatil <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Jun 2000 11:27:17 +0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1306 Antony Sher's Macbeth

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Jun 2000 08:35:14 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1306 Antony Sher's Macbeth

[3]     From:   Jean Peterson <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Jun 2000 12:11:50 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Anthony Sher's Macbeth

[4]     From:   Jeffrey Myers <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Jun 2000 12:41:27 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1306 Antony Sher's Macbeth

[5]     From:   Bill Gelber <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Jun 2000 18:24:14 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1306 Antony Sher's Macbeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jaysinh Birjepatil <
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Date:           Wednesday, 28 Jun 2000 11:27:17 +0400
Subject: 11.1306 Antony Sher's Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1306 Antony Sher's Macbeth

I share Charles Weinstein's opinion of Sher's Macbeth. The man is also a
prowler and wheels about the stage like a caged animal even during his
first encounter with the Witches who look more like badly dressed
members of ya ya sisterhood rather than 'weird'.  This playing down of
the supernatural in this production and the rather inane gestures by
Macbeth and Seyton toward Ian Kott kind of Shakespearean contemporaneity
preceding the 'poor player who struts and frets upon the stage'
sequence  never quite achieve the sense of stoic absurdity of the Mock
Trial in King Lear directed by Peter Brook. Unless my memory is letting
me down here, at the Long Warf in New Haven, the actor playing Seyton
also doubled as the Porter and rendered him in a bizarre combination of
De Quinceyan comic relief and interactive menacing of front row
audience. His performance lacked the subterranean menace of the Theatre
of the Absurd. As Frank Kermode pointed out long ago, the seesaw rhythm
of Macbeth's language in particular mimes the pulsations and
oscillations of a mind being made before our very eyes and to my mind
requires no wild physical gestures to convey psychic turmoil. In Sher's
interpretation theatrical semiosis creaks under a hypertrophy of
information. I came away feeling that in this production  RSC had
fielded a B team.

J. Birjepatil

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 28 Jun 2000 08:35:14 -0700
Subject: 11.1306 Antony Sher's Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1306 Antony Sher's Macbeth

Charles Weinstein writes:

>Actors who are short or gay can have a difficult time playing brutally
>effective warriors.

I can never tell if actors are gay, so it makes almost no difference to
me in watching them play a role.  On the other hand, I do know that some
short actors have been able to play warriors.  Hence the career of Mel
Gibson.

Cheers,
Se

 

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