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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: June ::
Re: Georgia's Tempest Production
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1332  Friday, 30 June 2000.

[1]     From:   Aimee Luzier <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jun 2000 13:25:33 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1316 Northern Georgia Tempest Production

[2]     From:   Fran Teague <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 Jun 2000 13:40:14 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1316 Georgia's Tempest Production


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Aimee Luzier <
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Date:           Thursday, 29 Jun 2000 13:25:33 EDT
Subject: 11.1316 Northern Georgia Tempest Production
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1316 Northern Georgia Tempest Production

Maybe I'm a purist, I am a "retired" actor after all, but I hope to
heaven that the technology failed in that production.  It's bad enough
that Lucas and co. think it's fine to replace human actors with
digitalized images and voiceovers in the movies, (they're so easy to
work with after all), but I hate the idea of applying it to theatre and
to Shakespearean plays in particular.  Yes, if Shakespeare were writing
now, he would probably make use of any existing technology to tell his
stories as effectively as he could.  But would he replace the actors
that he seems to have loved so much with puppets?  Also, theatre is a
different animal entirely than film.  The experience of theatre is that
of a one-time only experience with a particular group of people in the
audience (each audience has its own chemistry), a particular group of
actors on stage and a moment of community that happens live and will
never happen again in exactly the same way.  One trend I find very
disheartening in live theatre is when theatre tries to compete with film
by importing helicopters on the stage (for example).  By replacing
actors with what are essentially high-tech puppets, we reduce the
complexity and the potential engagement of audiences and play down to an
audience that we think is too passive to respond with their imaginations
(that most important word in theatre) to what is a communal fiction or
dream.  I'm sorry if I sound too heated on this subject, but I love
theatre and Shakespeare, and too many of these high-tech solutions are
just plain dehumanizing to put it bluntly.  Often, when people in charge
don't trust actors to tell the bloody story, they add in spectacle to
draw in the audience or dazzle the ignorant.  It's all-too-common in
film so let's for heaven's sake try to keep it out of the theatre, or at
least used to support the actors' efforts, not to replace them.  Thus
sayeth the prophet....

Aimee Luzier

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 29 Jun 2000 13:40:14 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 11.1316 Georgia's Tempest Production
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1316 Georgia's Tempest Production

Jack Heller asks about the University of Georgia Tempest that used
advanced technology (notably a motion capture suit for Ariel).  At the
moment the production website is down, but one of my colleagues has
posted his papers by his students who saw it. The URL is
http://www.english.uga.edu/3k/papers3frame.html

The production's director was David Saltz and you might write him
(
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 ). And I am working on a short essay about it:
e-mail me off-list if you want to discuss it further.

Fran Teague <http://www.arches.uga.edu/~fteague>
 

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