2000

Pedagogy: Course Structure

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1253  Wednesday, 21 June 2000.

From:           Bob White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Jun 2000 09:59:55 -0400
Subject:        Pedagogy: Course Structure

Dear SHAKSPERians,

I'm interested in learning how other teachers of Shakespeare structure
their courses.  I'm asking here about organizational patterns and
approaches other than the usual division of the plays into genres or
time periods, i.e., approaches that help unify the material even when it
falls within courses entitled "Shakespeare's Comedies" or "Shakespeare
to 1601."  In other words, how do we build the course (through
selection, through emphasis on certain themes, or through 16th century
history, for example) to prevent it from becoming a serial reading of
discrete plays?  What works and what doesn't work?

Thanks,  Bob White

Character Biblio Addition

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1252  Wednesday, 21 June 2000.

From:           Andrew McAleer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 20 Jun 2000 14:42:33 +0100
Subject:        Character Biblio Addition

I have an addition for the list of publications that feature Shakespeare
as a character, and it's an unusual one. It's a Doctor Who book, in the
'Missing Adventures' range. It's called Empire of Glass and it's by Andy
Lane. It was published by Virgin in 1995. In the book, Shakespeare is
moonlighting as a spy for the Jacobean court and is undercover in
Venice. He returns to London just in time to play Lady Macbeth for a
performance in front of King James.

Andrew McAleer
Editorial Assistant
Thomson Learning

2001 Ohio Shakespeare Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1250  Tuesday, 20 June 2000.

From:           Joseph Sullivan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Jun 2000 20:01:31 -0400
Subject:        2001 Ohio Shakespeare Conference

Call for Panels and Papers
2001 Ohio Shakespeare Conference
University of Toledo, March 1-3
"The Nature of Shakespeare"
Deadline for submission: November 3, 2000

http://uhenglab.uhe.utoledo.edu/Shakespeare/OSCHomeFinal.html

Our plenary speaker will be Rebecca Bushnell speaking on "Shakespeare
and the Bias of Nature."  The Shenandoah Shakespeare Express will
perform 12th Night, Othello, and The Roaring Girl.  We will also feature
a lecture entitled "Shakespeare's Gardens" at the Toledo Museum of Art
followed by a guided tour of the museum.

We are open to a wide variety of interpretations concerning the "nature"
of Shakespeare.

Send panel or paper proposals to:

Russ Bodi
University Hall, Department of English
The University of Toledo
Toledo, OH  43606-3390

Announcement: www.stoics.com

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1251  Tuesday, 20 June 2000.

From:           Ben R. Schneider <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Jun 2000 18:02:15 -0700
Subject:        Announcement

A N N O U N C E M E N T

My web site

                www.stoics.com

entitled "Shakespeare's Morals, The Stoic Legacy to the Renaissance,"
now makes available all the ethical authorities originally promised in
April 1999.   But equally worthy of note is that all my indexes to these
books have been automated:  if you want to know what Montaigne says that
may help explain Hamlet in a book of his Essays, simply point to
"Hamlet" in the index and click.  The relevant passage or passages will
instantly pop up.  To find out what book indexes refer to "Hamlet" go to
the BOOK page and use your borrower's FIND utility to search the indexes
for that word.  Beside tagging pertinent passages with the names of
characters in Shakespeare, I have marked Stoic buzz words like
"posterity " and "fortune" in the texts for indexing.  There are about
2000 index-to-text links.

The site now presents Cicero's De Officiis, the six volumes of Seneca's
moral works, three volumes of North's translation of Plutarch's Lives, a
fourth volume in Dryden translation, Elyot's Governour, three books of
Florio's translation of Montaigne's Essays, Books I, II, and VI of
Spenser's Faerie Queene, Book I of Sidney's New Arcadia (index only),
James I's Basilikon Doron, and  Hall's Characters of the Virtues and
Vices.  Erasmus's Institution Of a Christian Prince will appear soon.

Ben R. Schneider, Jr
Emeritus. Lawrence University

"the yeoman of London" and "Sergeant at the Mace"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1249  Tuesday, 20 June 2000.

From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 19 Jun 2000 16:10:11 -0500
Subject:        "the yeoman of London" and "Sergeant at the Mace"

Can anyone help with identification of the positions or offices alluded
to in the following passage, from George Puttenham's Art of English
Poesy (1589; Book III, chapter 15):

. . . of all others was that a most ridiculous, but very true exchange,
which the yeoman of London vsed with his Sergeant at the Mace, who said
he would goe into the countrie, and make merry a day or two, while his
man plyed his busines at home[.]

Printed explanation would be especially useful.

Many thanks.

Frank Whigham
Professor of English
University of Texas at Austin

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