2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0097  Monday, 17 January 2000.

[1]     From:   Yvonne Bruce <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 14 Jan 2000 12:12:37 -0500
        Subj:   "Doctors," Professional and Social Titles, Correct Use Of

[2]     From:   Syd Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 16 Jan 2000 07:04:54 +0200 (IST)
        Subj:   SHK 11.0070 Re: "Doctors"

[3]     From:   Syd Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 16 Jan 2000 07:04:57 +0200 (IST)
        Subj:   SHK 11.0070 Re: "Doctors"

[4]     From:   John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 17 Jan 2000 09:21:43 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0083 Re: "Doctors"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Yvonne Bruce <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 14 Jan 2000 12:12:37 -0500
Subject:        "Doctors," Professional and Social Titles, Correct Use Of

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

Doesn't anyone read Miss Manners?

Sincerely,
Yvonne Bruce

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Syd Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 16 Jan 2000 07:04:54 +0200 (IST)
Subject: Re: "Doctors"
Comment:        SHK 11.0070 Re: "Doctors"

Graduates of  the high school I attended had no problem with academic
doctors: we were blessed three of them - in Physics, English and Latin,
the latter a petite auburn-haired young woman (in the middle 1940's!!).
One might argue that the great depression produced PhDs willing to
compromise for a secure public high school salary at the expense of
academic ambitions.  The fact is that their love for their subjects and
the respect and affection they had for their students made them superb
teachers, and raised the academic ambience. Many of their students went
on to become M.D.s and Dentists.  I doubt that any one of them was
jealous of the title Doctor as applied to academics.  I would submit
that the existence of this thread implies that there are not enough Phds
in the high schools.

With all due respect and affection,

Syd Kasten (Doctoris in Medicina)

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Syd Kasten <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 16 Jan 2000 07:04:57 +0200 (IST)
Subject: Re: "Doctors"
Comment:        SHK 11.0070 Re: "Doctors"

>>Interesting article on how successful placebos are in treating patients
>>in this past Sunday's N Y Times.  It seems leeches worked!
>
>I'm not surprised; Doctors of Philosophy have been administering
>placebos for centuries.

At least leeches worked.  Before the development of fast acting
digitalis drugs and pacemakers leeches and bloodletting were lifesaving
measures for patients suffering with congestive heart failure.

Best wishes
Syd Kasten

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 17 Jan 2000 09:21:43 -0000
Subject: 11.0083 Re: "Doctors"
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0083 Re: "Doctors"

Perhaps I might rudely drag this thread back on topic?  Does anyone know
if Shakespeare's son-in-law, the Stratford physician John Hall, actually
had a doctorate?  He was a university man (MA Cambridge), so it is quite
possible that he had an MD, but none of my reference works is able to
answer this question.

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the doctorates awarded were
DD, LLD, DMus and MD.  The habit of calling all medics "Dr" probably
arose from the boom in the Scottish university medical schools in the
eighteenth century which awarded MDs.

By the way, the Archbishop of Canterbury, by virtue of his former office
as Papal Legate, used to award degrees: these were known as "Lambeth
Degrees".  (He still does: the present archbishop, Dr George Carey, was
awarded his doctorate by his predecessor when the appointment was
announced).  The seventeenth-century scientist and architect, Robert
Hooke, was awarded an MD late in life by the Archbishop of Canterbury,
but this hardly compensated for a lifetime of illness ...

The most common Latin form of "Doctor of Divinity" was S.T.P or Sacrae
Theologiae Professor, but that opens another can of worms ...

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