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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: February ::
Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0339  Tuesday, 13 February 2001

[1]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Feb 2001 12:50:35 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0325 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night

[2]     From:   Nicolas Pullin <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Feb 2001 15:53:32 -0600
        Subj:   SHK 12.0325 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night

[3]     From:   Don Bloom <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Feb 2001 07:56:14 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0325 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Ni


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Feb 2001 12:50:35 -0800
Subject: 12.0325 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0325 Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night

Abigail, you are not alone. I love this movie! I have always loved the
play, but in almost every performance have been bothered by some aspect
that didn't work. Feste is played too silly, Viola doesn't look or sound
like a youth and looks nothing like Sebastian, or something. This one
worked.

Of course Feste is dignified! He is the author, the poor
artist-philosopher whose job is to entertain his "betters", though he
himself is far more cultured than any of them. Though he spends most of
his time in sober observation, he participates eagerly in the
merry-making out of his great need to laugh away the sorrow of his
wisdom. Absolutely perfect!

And this Viola! What a moment when she puts on male clothing and turns
to the sea to gesture in exultation.  Is this about the story or isn't
it rather the Imogen Stubbs' own personal exultation at having a part to
play where she gets to show her (wonderfully) masculine side!  What
brilliant casting! It renders Olivia's passion thoroughly believable.

And the merry-making! So often Shakespeare's love of merry-making gets
toned down to the point where it, the whole point of Twelfth Night after
all, is lost to a modern audience whose sole connection with true
merry-making is an uptight cocktail party or an occasional lonely binge.
("For O, the hobby horse is forgot!") Bless Nunn for the marvelous
moments when Malvolio leaves Sir Toby, Maria and Sir Andrew to explode
in hilarity.

As for chopping up and rearranging the text

 

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