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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: February ::
Re: Ducks and Rabbits
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0360  Wednesday, 14 February 2001

[1]     From:   Ros King <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Feb 2001 19:56:00 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0341 Re: Ducks and Rabbits

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Feb 2001 10:26:52 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0341 Re: Ducks and Rabbits


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ros King <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Feb 2001 19:56:00 +0000
Subject: 12.0341 Re: Ducks and Rabbits
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0341 Re: Ducks and Rabbits

These joke pictures are also commonly used, for example, in
sixteenth/seventeenth century anti-catholic propagandist prints: here's
a fox - whoops, no, the other way up it's a cardinal!

Ros

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Feb 2001 10:26:52 -0800
Subject: 12.0341 Re: Ducks and Rabbits
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0341 Re: Ducks and Rabbits

David Evett suggests:

>David Nicol's friend might enjoy the work of the later C16 Milanese
>painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who constructed what seem at a little
>distance to be human faces and figures that on closer inspection are
>platters of vegetables.

You might also enjoy Aretino's Italian medal with "his own, ennobled
head on one side and, on the reverse, that of a satyr entirely composed
of penises and testicles" (John Hale, _Civilization of Europe in the
Renaissance_, 435).  It's not quite what you had in mind, but it this
complicates the irony of Arcimboldo's portraiture:  not only is the
satyr really a bunch of sex organs, but the flip side of the medal shows
a completely 'straight' image of a man.

Cheers,
Se

 

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