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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: February ::
Re: Pronouncing Faustus
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0406  Tuesday, 20 February 2001

[1]     From:   Werner Broennimann <
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        Date:   Monday, 19 Feb 2001 09:55:28 +0000
        Subj:   Pronouncing Faustus

[2]     From:   John Briggs <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 20 Feb 2001 10:07:26 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 12.0393 Re: Pronouncing Faustus


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Broennimann <
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Date:           Monday, 19 Feb 2001 09:55:28 +0000
Subject:        Pronouncing Faustus

Brother Anthony writes: "I have to be careful in Korea not to use a
diphthong in speaking Plato(n)'s name ...

Please let us know why.  I am interested in this because the
non-transferrability of names and brands into other cultures poses a
permanent problem (the "Nova" that did not sell in Spanish speaking
countries, because no va means "it does not run"); my favourite
counter-example which exemplifies Shakespearean unawareness in the
general public is the success story and reliability reputation of the
Toyota Cressida.

Werner

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <
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Date:           Tuesday, 20 Feb 2001 10:07:26 -0000
Subject: 12.0393 Re: Pronouncing Faustus
Comment:        RE: SHK 12.0393 Re: Pronouncing Faustus

To address Brother Anthony's question on the pronunciation of Latin:
this is easily answered by reference to Harold Copeman's "Singing in
Latin" or Timothy McGee's "Singing Early Music".  Essentially, Latin was
pronounced in the same way as the vernacular language in all counties
until the end of the nineteenth century.  This meant that international
communication was less straightforward than would have been expected!
(The humanists tried to revive classical pronunciation, but this didn't
catch on).  "Classical" pronunciation of Latin was revived at the end of
the nineteenth century for school use and had been accepted by the
mid-twentieth century.  At the beginning of the twentieth century the
familiar "Italianate" pronunciation of Church Latin was rapidly and
universally (well, globally anyway!) enforced in the Roman Catholic
Church.  (This seems to have been connected with the acceptance of the
Solesmes revival/reform of Gregorian Chant)  By the 1930s even Anglican
choirs were using the Italianate pronunciation for e.g. performances of
Latin sacred polyphony.

In the Early Music world there is a lot of interest in the use of
"authentic pronunciation" for performances of early vocal or choral
works, and I live in hope that this will be tried at Shakespeare's
Globe...

John Briggs
 

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