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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: February ::
Re: Shakespeare and Italy
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0424  Thursday, 22 February 2001

[1]     From:   Kristine Steenbergh <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 22:02:36 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy

[2]     From:   Frank Whigham <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 15:14:36 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy

[3]     From:   Diana Price <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 18:43:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy

[4]     From:   Fran Barasch <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 18:57:08 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and It

[5]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 22:50:07
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare and Italy

[6]     From:   Michele Marrapodi <
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        Date:   Thursday, 22 Feb 2001 14:10:57 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kristine Steenbergh <
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Date:           Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 22:02:36 +0100
Subject: 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy

 David Schalkwyk asked:

 >Does anyone perhaps know the publication details of an essay written
 >some years ago by G.K. Hunter (I think) on the significance of Italy
in
 >Elizabethan and Jacobean plays?  Has there been any further
scholarship
 >on the matter that has extended or contradicted Hunter's argument?

G. K. Hunter's *Dramatic Identities and Cultural Tradition* (Liverpool:
Liverpool UP, 1978) reprints two essays that match your description:
"English Folly and Italian Vice" and "Italian Tragicomedy on the English
Stage."

For more recent publications on the subject, I would recommend *The
Italian World of English Renaissance Drama* (U. of Delaware Press) and
*Shakespeare's Italy* (Manchester UP), both edited by Michele Marrapodi
et al. The latter volume also contains an extensive bibliography.

 Hope to have been of help,

 Kristine Steenbergh
 Utrecht University
 The Netherlands

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <
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Date:           Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 15:14:36 -0600
Subject: 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy

Hunter, G. K. "English Folly and Italian Vice: The Moral Landscape of
John Marston." In Jacobean Theatre. 1960: 85-111.

Frank Whigham

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Diana Price <
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Date:           Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 18:43:54 -0500
Subject: 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy

| Does anyone perhaps know the publication details of an essay written
| some years ago by G.K. Hunter (I think) on the significance of Italy
in
| Elizabethan and Jacobean plays?  Has there been any further
scholarship
| on the matter that has extended or contradicted Hunter's argument?

The following for Hunter is from the bibliography in *Shakespeare's
Italy,*ed. Marrapodi, et al (rev. 1997):

"Italian tragicomedy on the English Stage," *Renaissance Drama,* n.s. 6,
1973, pp. 123-48.

"English folly and Italian vice: the moral landscape of John Marston,"
in *Dramatic Identities and Cultural Tradition: Studies in Shakespeare
and his Contemporaries,* English Texts and Studies, Liverpool: 1978, pp.
103-21; originally published in Jacobean Theatre, eds. J.R. Brown and B.
Harris, Stratford-upon-Avon Studies 1, London, 1960, pp. 85-111.

"Elizabethans and Foreigners," in *Dramatic Identities and Cultural
Tradition: Studies in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries,* English Texts
and Studies, Liverpool: 1978, pp. pp. 3-30.

Diana Price

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Barasch <
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Date:           Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 18:57:08 EST
Subject: 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy

To David Schalkwyk:

A good deal of work on Shakespeare and Italy has been done since
Hunter's. The bibliography is too long for me to cite.  May I suggest
you start with my article "Shakespeare and the Italians," in "The
Shakespearean International Yearbook," eds. Elton and Mucciolo
(Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999) and then go to "Shakespeare and Italy:
Shakespeare Yearbook," X , eds. Klein and Marrapodi (Lewiston: Mellen,
1999).  Marrapodi edited two earlier volumes on same subject, and the
list goes on and on.  Good luck, Fran Barasch

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Takashi Kozuka <
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Date:           Wednesday, 21 Feb 2001 22:50:07
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare and Italy

The best way to follow up the scholarship is to use the online MLA
Bibliography or the online World Shakespeare Bibliography. Happy
reading!

Takashi Kozuka
PhD Student
Centre for the Study of the Renaissance
University of Warwick (UK)

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[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michele Marrapodi <
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Date:           Thursday, 22 Feb 2001 14:10:57 +0100
Subject: 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0418 Shakespeare and Italy

>Does anyone perhaps know the publication details of an essay written
>some years ago by G.K. Hunter (I think) on the significance of Italy in
>Elizabethan and Jacobean plays?  Has there been any further scholarship
>on the matter that has extended or contradicted Hunter's argument?

Most of Hunter's essays on the Elizabethans' views of Italy are included
in his _Dramatic Identities and Cultural Traditions: Studies in
Shakespeare and His Contemporaries_ (Liverpool: Liverpool U.P., 1978), a
powerful book, still useful and stimulating.

The rubric of "Shakespeare and Italy", however, is a huge topic with a
long critical tradition opened to a variety of perspectives. To confine
the subject-matter to recent years , the setting has been discussed by
Murray J. Levith (_Shakespeare's Italian Settings and Plays_,
Basingstoke:
Macmillan, 1989) and D. C. McPherson (_Shakespeare, Jonson and the Myth
of Venice_, Newark: Univ. of Delaware P., 1990). A collection of essays
by a range of international scholars has regarded the setting as a
structural constituent in early modern English drama (_Shakespeare's
Italy: Functions of Italian Locations in Renaissance Drama, ed. M.
Marrapodi, A.J.  Hoenselaars, M. Cappuzzo and L. Falzon Santucci,
Manchester: MUP, 1993; revised pb. edition, 1997).  Ideology and
cultural traditions are focused in  Marrapodi's _La Sicilia nella
drammaturgia giacomiana e carolina_ (Rome: Herder, 1989), whereas
Italian culture, literature and drama are debated in L. Salingar's
_Shakespeare and the Traditions of Comedy_ (Cambridge: CUP, 1974),
Louise G. Clubb's _Italian Drama in Shakespeare's Time_ (New Haven: Yale
UP, 1989), R. Miola's _Shakespeare and Classical Tragedy: The Influence
of Seneca_ and _Shakespeare and Classical Comedy: The Influence of
Plautus and Terence_ (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992 and 1994
respectively), Robert Henke's, _Pastoral Transformations: Italian
Tragicomedy and Shakespeare's Late Plays_ (Newark: Univ. of Delaware P.,
1997), and in the following collections of essays: _Theatre of the
English and Italian Renaissance_ ed. J.R. Mulryne and M. Shewring
(London: Macmillan, 1991), _The Italian World of English Renaissance
Drama: Cultural Exchange and Intertextuality, ed. M. Marrapodi (Newark:
Univ. of Delaware P., 1998). Sources and intertextuality are examined in
_Nel laboratorio di Shakespeare: dalle fonti ai drammi_, ed. A. Serpieri
et al., 4 Vols.  (Parma: Pratiche, 1986), and in _Shakespeare and
Intertextuality: The Transition of Cultures Between Italy and England in
the Early Modern Period_, ed. M. Marrapodi (Rome: Bulzoni, 2000). An
attempt to provide a comprehensive approach to the topic, including
translation and performance studies, is the "Shakespeare and Italy"
number of _Shakespeare Yearbook_, X (1999), edited by M. Marrapodi and
Holger Klein.

Michele Marrapodi,
University of Palermo.
 

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