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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: February ::
Re: A Lear Record
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0457  Tuesday, 27 February 2001

[1]     From:   Bill Gelber <
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        Date:   Monday, 26 Feb 2001 08:51:14 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0446 A Lear Record

[2]     From:   Tad Davis <
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        Date:   Monday, 26 Feb 2001 22:39:13 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0446 A Lear Record


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Gelber <
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Date:           Monday, 26 Feb 2001 08:51:14 EST
Subject: 12.0446 A Lear Record
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0446 A Lear Record

It may be the "Living Shakespeare" recording, from a series which always
seemed to have narration at the beginning. It starred Donald Wolfit.

Bill Gelber

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <
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Date:           Monday, 26 Feb 2001 22:39:13 -0500
Subject: 12.0446 A Lear Record
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0446 A Lear Record

Robert Shaughnessy wrote:

>Can anyone help identify an ancient gramophone recording of King Lear
>with (I think) Michael Hordern in the lead? It begins with a wonderful
>rasping fanfare and narrative exposition ('Lear, King of Britain, is
>old...').

If memory serves, it may be one of the entries in the Living Shakespeare
series. If so, it's not Michael Hordern but Donald Wolfit. The series
matched "name" actors with highly abridged versions of the play and
elaborate music and sound effects. Each came with an introduction by
Bernard Grebanier ("What Happens in Hamlet") and the text of the
adaptation plus the full text of the play.

Of course it's always possible that more than one old LP begins with a
rasping fanfare and a narrator speaking exactly those words.

Tad Davis
 

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