2001

Re: Carl Upchurch

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0458  Tuesday, 27 February 2001

From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday 26 Feb 2001 06:53:09 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 12.0444 Re: Carl Upchurch
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0444 Re: Carl Upchurch

Alex Houck writes in response to a query on the term "niggerized":

> ....So the word nigger is meant to
> evoke the bottom of
> the barrel.

As a further illustrative example, see the Lennon-Ono song, "Woman is
the Nigger of the World."

Cheers,
Karen E. Peterson

Re: A Lear Record

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0457  Tuesday, 27 February 2001

[1]     From:   Bill Gelber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Feb 2001 08:51:14 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0446 A Lear Record

[2]     From:   Tad Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Feb 2001 22:39:13 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0446 A Lear Record


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Gelber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Feb 2001 08:51:14 EST
Subject: 12.0446 A Lear Record
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0446 A Lear Record

It may be the "Living Shakespeare" recording, from a series which always
seemed to have narration at the beginning. It starred Donald Wolfit.

Bill Gelber

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Feb 2001 22:39:13 -0500
Subject: 12.0446 A Lear Record
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0446 A Lear Record

Robert Shaughnessy wrote:

>Can anyone help identify an ancient gramophone recording of King Lear
>with (I think) Michael Hordern in the lead? It begins with a wonderful
>rasping fanfare and narrative exposition ('Lear, King of Britain, is
>old...').

If memory serves, it may be one of the entries in the Living Shakespeare
series. If so, it's not Michael Hordern but Donald Wolfit. The series
matched "name" actors with highly abridged versions of the play and
elaborate music and sound effects. Each came with an introduction by
Bernard Grebanier ("What Happens in Hamlet") and the text of the
adaptation plus the full text of the play.

Of course it's always possible that more than one old LP begins with a
rasping fanfare and a narrator speaking exactly those words.

Tad Davis

Chinese Medicine

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0455  Monday, 26 February 2001

From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 25 Feb 2001 04:58:51 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Chinese Medicine

I suppose I should preface this with a warning, a la Richard Burt, that
the following involves "adult content."

In a book on applications of traditional Chinese healing practices to
sex, I encountered the following:

"The [Chinese] ancients contended that a man could be weakened by
beginning intercourse before the woman is completely ready.  Said one:
'If the woman's secretions have not yet issued forth and her private
parts are dry, but the man forces his way, then the jade stalk simply
pierces in vain and it is a useless waste of spirit.' ....the man can't
fully receive chi from his woman, since she is not adequately primed for
giving.  He gives up sexual energy to his lover with his orgasm but does
not receive as much in return." (Felice Dumas, *Passion Play,* New York:
1997, p. 104)

Dumas, alas, does not provide the source for this quote (it's not really
that kind of book!).  If anyone recognizes where this might have come
from, I'd be interested.

The translation (if in fact it is a translation and Dumas didn't just
make it up) seems influenced by Sonnet 129 ("Th'expense of spirit in a
waste of shame / Is lust in action").  If the physiological concept
proposed above is at all true, perhaps Sonnet 129 might be read not so
much as a misogynistic condemnation of all heterosexual intercourse, but
rather as an expression of frustration at over-hasty heterosexual
intercourse.

Just a thought.

Cheers,
Karen E. Peterson

Re: Welsh etc.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0456  Tuesday, 27 February 2001

[1]     From:   Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Feb 2001 07:49:45 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0443 Re: Welsh etc

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Feb 2001 08:11:44 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0443 Re: Welsh etc.

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Feb 2001 13:23:07 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0443 Re: Welsh etc.

[4]     From:   Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Feb 2001 15:45:40 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0443 Re: Welsh etc.

[5]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Feb 2001 17:38:58 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0443 Re: Welsh etc.


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Feb 2001 07:49:45 -0600
Subject: 12.0443 Re: Welsh etc.
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0443 Re: Welsh etc.

 Terence Hawkes writes:

>I know very little about the Bethlehem Hospital, but I have a research
>student who's working in this area and she knows a great deal. Her work
>suggests that there isn't much hard evidence in the early modern period
>for the practice of visiting the inmates for the purposes of
>entertainment.
>
>The interesting question is why so many scholars want to believe that
>there is.

I don't think it's a matter of wanting to slander our cultural /
linguistic ancestors, but a myth that becomes accepted because it makes
sense logically. We have hard evidence of this custom existing a hundred
to two hundred years later. We note what appear to be improvements in
the treatment of people in several areas (such as prisoners and victims
of capital punishment). We note the entertainment value of the "insane"
in several plays and of the retarded in the "fools" used as jesters. We
apply our Myth of Progress. We conclude that the custom existed in
Elizabethan England.. That it didn't (if your student is correct and it
indeed did not) may possibly be explained by a lack of the easy
accessibility found in the later eras.

I have always assumed that 19th Century liberalism -- to which this
thought, I believe, belongs -- derived largely from certain changes in
sensibility that occurred in the 18th century (the name Rousseau looms
large here, but it was already under way before he wrote), which took a
much more sentimental attitude toward the poor and victimized than had
occurred in the past. I don't find much affection for or pity of the
poor in Shakespeare (quite the reverse), but none in the others of his
time, either.

To lob the ball back into the other side's court: isn't Prince Hal
unique in actually enjoying the company of people from the lower orders?

Cheers,
don

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Feb 2001 08:11:44 -0800
Subject: 12.0443 Re: Welsh etc.
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0443 Re: Welsh etc.

Terence writes:

>I know very little about the Bethlehem Hospital, but I have a research
>student who's working in this area and she knows a great deal. Her work
>suggests that there isn't much hard evidence in the early modern period
>for the practice of visiting the inmates for the purposes of
>entertainment.
>
>The interesting question is why so many scholars want to believe that
>there is.

It is an interesting question, but it seems indicative of a wider
tendency to believe anything perverse if it's projected unto the past.
Hence Freudian readings of sexuality and celibacy in the middle ages,
histories of the inquisition based entirely on the Holy Office's own
padded figures, vastly inflated numbers of witches burned, sociological
arguments to the effect that nobody loved their children, etc.  In fact,
it seems to follow from an almost religious conviction in one of
Terence's favourite themes, that the past is different.

One might, I think, make a comparison between how we treat the early
modern period, and how the early moderns treated Islam or the new world.

Cheers,
Se


Re: Lear's Estate Planning

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0454  Monday, 26 February 2001

From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 24 Feb 2001 19:49:53 -0500
Subject: 12.0431 Re: Lear's Estate Planning
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0431 Re: Lear's Estate Planning

Although I don't really have an opinion regarding an underlying incest
theme in the play.  I am curious about the phrase used by Manuela
Rossini: "sedimented in the text of the play at its originary moment of
production." Is this the euphemism to which the taboo on reference to
authorial intention has driven us?

Clifford Stetner
CUNY

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