2001

Re: Welsh etc.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0276  Tuesday, 6 February 2001

[1]     From:   Edmond Taft<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 05 Feb 2001 10:35:47 -0500
        Subj:   Welsh in _Henry IV_

[2]     From:   Richard Regan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 5 Feb 2001 23:33:25 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0256 Re: Welsh etc.

[3]     From:   Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 06 Feb 2001 09:31:11 +0000
        Subj:   Welsh


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edmond Taft<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 05 Feb 2001 10:35:47 -0500
Subject:        Welsh in _Henry IV_

J.C. Trewin once remarked that he could not watch the episode between
Hal and Francis in Part 1 without losing all sympathy for Hal.  He did
not say why he felt this way, but I suspect that his feelings derive
from Hal's demonstration that he can manipulate the poor drawer to the
point where he is literally turning around in circles and going nowhere.

Now, Francis is a kind of everyman isn't he? -- just like most of us in
the audience, a poor working stiff whose only crime is that he had a
beer with the prince.  So isn't the Francis episode a demonstration of
Hal's earlier claim that he "knows us all"?  His soliloquy at the end of
1.2 is about manipulating us and making us like it, isn't it?

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Regan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 5 Feb 2001 23:33:25 EST
Subject: 12.0256 Re: Welsh etc.
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0256 Re: Welsh etc.

How about the several dialects of Edgar in King Lear? What actor did
Shakespeare have in mind for that versatile performance? And does Kent
change his voice?

Richard Regan
Fairfield University

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Broennimann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 06 Feb 2001 09:31:11 +0000
Subject:        Welsh

D. Chapman asks, with a strong Welsh accent, "Nez pas?"  Nice macaronic
gambit, using the much neglected forensic ploy of argumentum ab naso
suspendente.  Mate, cheers, WB

Re: Wittenberg and Paris

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0275  Tuesday, 6 February 2001

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 05 Feb 2001 08:11:54 -0800
Subject: 12.0266 Re: Wittenberg and Paris
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0266 Re: Wittenberg and Paris

>At least, you COULD (as I do) understand the grim joke
>differently. When "Hamlet" was written, ALL of the differing confessions
>"unchurched" other Christians. John Donne, after leaving the Roman
>church, and before and after entering the English church, consistently
>expressed his fear that the effect of this "unchurching" would be to
>drive men into disbelief, by making God appear a tyrant (for reasons
>that were political, rather than religious).

This is fascinating, especially the reference to Falkland, which I cut
but read.

I'm wondering whether the move towards ecumenism should be confused with
a move towards atheism, however, as the quotation below seems to
indicate:

>My own (frankly, helplessly speculative)
>guess would be that, if you want literary evidence for the practical and
>historical truth of Donne's fear about how good Christians would be (and
>were} driven into disbelief by the differing confessions, it is there in
>"Hamlet", "Macbeth" and "King Lear". In Shakespearean tragedy, not to
>mention plays like "Measure for Measure", the real or putative
>references to Christianity always and only increase the terror, and are
>never a source of consolation.

Could the characters not just be abandoning their all-too
providentialist or dogmatic faiths towards a view of the divine as
really transcendent?  The gods in Lear, especially, seem to have a
strong existential relationship to the characters who propose them.  But
abandoning such gods might be a positive step towards a view of God as
alterior, as something more than a political construct.

Cheers,
Se


Poor Yorick Beta Site

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0273  Tuesday, 6 February 2001

From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 5 Feb 2001 10:51:19 -0500
Subject:        Poor Yorick Beta Site

Poor Yorick is proud to announce that our new website is finally ready
for beta-testing.  We now have search capabilities in either US or
Canadian dollars and on-line ordering, and our extended details pages
now allow for much more extensive information, including track listing
for audio and cast lists for video, although these elements will be
added gradually over the next year or so.

We would like to invite SHAKSPER-L members to preview the site while we
test the system.  Comments, suggestions and broken link reports are most
welcome.  In addition, we are offering a special 10% discount (shipping
excluded) for all orders placed on-line through the month of February.

The address for the beta-site is
http://www.bardcentral.com/entrance.html.  If you are planning to
bookmark the page, please not that this page will become the default
www.bardcentral.com when the beta-testing period is over.

Many thanks,
Tanya Gough
Poor Yorick Shakespeare Multimedia

Catalogue of English Cookery Books 1500-1700

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0274  Tuesday, 6 February 2001

From:           Pat Cornett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 05 Feb 2001 10:41:33 -0500
Subject:        Catalogue of English Cookery Books 1500-1700

Does anyone know if a catalogue of English cookery books between
1500-1700 has been published in the last 20 years? Such a book is listed
as in progress on the back cover of Maclean's similar catalogue for
1701-1800, which was published in 1981. I've already searched Amazon and
bookfinders.com, but no luck there.

I'm researching the subject for a proposed book I'm writing on
Shakespeare and cookery (not a cookbook).

I'd appreciate any information about this book or similar books and
other materials on the subject.

Thanks,
Pat Cornett
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Branagh

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0272  Tuesday, 6 February 2001

[1]     From:   Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 5 Feb 2001 12:50:18 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0257 Re: Branagh

[2]     From:   Tad Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 05 Feb 2001 15:22:52 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0257 Re: Branagh

[3]     From:   Drew Whitehead <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 06 Feb 2001 22:25:19 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0250 Is Kenneth quitting?

[4]     From:   Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 6 Feb 2001 08:36:30 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0257 Re: Kenneth ("a little o'erparted") Branagh


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 5 Feb 2001 12:50:18 EST
Subject: 12.0257 Re: Branagh
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0257 Re: Branagh

I haven't seen LLL, nor any of Mr. Doniger's Shakespeare films, but I
kept the poster for Branagh's Much Ado by my desk for several years
because it lightened my spirit, lifted my heart. I was and am glad to be
in a world where a person commits so much of his life to sharing the
work of
Shakespeare. I will not like to see him stop, but he is young, and may
start again.

Kezia Vanmeter Sproat

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 05 Feb 2001 15:22:52 -0500
Subject: 12.0257 Re: Branagh
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0257 Re: Branagh

I've been and remain a great fan of Branagh and his Shakespeare films. I
think it's a shame that economics and critical reception being what they
are, a single failure should have such a daunting effect on a gifted
filmmaker.

Tad Davis

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Drew Whitehead <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 06 Feb 2001 22:25:19 +1000
Subject: 12.0250 Is Kenneth quitting?
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0250 Is Kenneth quitting?

For my part I would be sorry that anyone should feel that they had to
give up making Shakespeare for the big screen.  It was Branagh's Henry V
that got me interested in Shakespeare all those years ago and I would
credit him at being at the forefront and an instigator of the modern
film rejuvenation of Shakespeare.  I have not seen his Love's Labour's
Lost (it has not been released here yet, if ever) so I cannot comment on
that particular movie.  But I have enjoyed his other outings and I will
be disappointed if this news truly is the case.

Drew Whitehead

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 6 Feb 2001 08:36:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 12.0257 Re: Kenneth ("a little o'erparted") Branagh
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0257 Re: Kenneth ("a little o'erparted") Branagh

Every Shakespeare film made by Branagh since Henry V has been worthless,
and his own classical performances have ranged from the mediocre (Iago)
to the unspeakable (Hamlet).  I was not looking forward to his Macbeth:
a role that has baffled every actor since Olivier (including McKellen
and Jacobi) was not going to be aced by him.  My only consolation was
that his divorce from Emma Thompson and his separation from Helena
Bonham-Carter had spared us the trial of watching either's Lady
Macbeth.  But with Branagh's infallible eye for casting exactly the
wrong actor, I'm sure he would have chosen someone equally
inappropriate.

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