2001

CASA courses in Stratford, Ontario

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0236  Thursday, 1 February 2001

From:           Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 11:14:58 -0500
Subject:        CASA courses in Stratford, Ontario

The Commonwealth Academy of Stage Arts (CASA) is looking for last minute
ideas to fill out their summer course schedule.

If anyone has any ideas of courses they might be interested in either
taking or potentially teaching can consult the CASA website at
www.casarts.com (click on the button for "This Summer  in Stratford,
Ontario), or e-mail John Brogan directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Programs will be offered from July 2nd to August 11th.

Tanya Gough
www.bardcentral.com

Re: A Non-Shakespearean Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0235  Thursday, 1 February 2001

From:           Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 11:09:34 -0500
Subject: 12.0220 A Non-Shakespearean Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0220 A Non-Shakespearean Question

Ed Kranz asked:

>Several months ago I read The Great Indian Novel by Shashi Tharoor. The
>Great Indian Novel is modeled on and parallels The Mahabharata.  Is
>there a term for a literary work like this i.e. one which rests on and
>is dependent on an earlier text for a full appreciation like Ulysses or
>the many which are underpinned by the Bible e.g. Joseph and His Brothers
>etc.?

The other mailing list I belong to is for science fiction fandom-- in
writing fanfic, we would call this either a pastiche or (if it combined
characters from several underlying works) a crossover.

Dana Shilling

Re: The Number 20

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0233  Thursday, 1 February 2001

[1]     From:   William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 10:29:02 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0218 Re: The Number 20

[2]     From:   Victor Bennison <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 11:31:26 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0218 Re: The Number 20

[3]     From:   Monica Chesnoiu <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 09:20:52 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 12.0205 The Number 20


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 10:29:02 -0500
Subject: 12.0218 Re: The Number 20
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0218 Re: The Number 20

There are, or were, 20 shillings in a pound sterling.

William Proctor Williams

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Victor Bennison <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 11:31:26 EST
Subject: 12.0218 Re: The Number 20
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0218 Re: The Number 20

Aha!  A mathematical question.  Finally something in my area.
Unfortunately my training in numerology was slighted so I'm reduced to
counting.  Looking at my concordance (I'm going on memory from last
night) 20 and 10 and I believe 4 all appear about the same number of
times.  I didn't look at all numbers, as I got bored after 20 turned out
not so singular.  The number 20, however, has some advantages over other
numbers. It corresponds to a "score".  It's a multiple of 10.  It is
used with other numbers in ways other multiples of 10 are not typically
used, such as "4 and 20 blackbirds".  And it is the smallest
two-syllable number that seems to scan nicely.  I know little about
scansion but fifteen feels awkward compared to twenty.  It must have to
do with the "n" at the end of fifteen, since fifty scans like twenty.
Twenty also has the nice alliterative 't's.  Twenty is the placeholder
of all numbers between 20 and 29, e.g., "my daughters are both in their
twenties".  That's about it for me.

- Victor Bennison

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Monica Chesnoiu <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 09:20:52 -0600
Subject: 12.0205 The Number 20
Comment:        RE: SHK 12.0205 The Number 20

Susan,

For your student there is an excellent book by Isabel Rivers, _Classical
and Christian Ideas in English Renaissance Poetry_ (London: Routledge,
1994).  There is a chapter on NUMEROLOGY.

Basically, there were several system of number symbolism available in
the Renaissance, and two are more familiar: Pythagorean and Biblical.

In the Pythagorean, Platonic and Neoplatonic tradition the first ten
numbers are especially significant. The Decad (10) is one of the most
important groups of numbers because 10=1+2+3+4. The system is not so
simple and it involves an entire superstructure of calculation and
philosophy. Insofar as 20 is a double of 10 some speculation might arise
from that.

To what extent were such numerological methods of composition used by
English Renaissance poets, this is a different matter. Rivers concludes
that not many poets adopted it. She mentions Spenser, Chapman, Milton
and Henry More. Did Shakespeare care to use it? I think it highly
improbable. Even more unlikely for his Southbank audiences to be able to
decode such a sophisticated poetic and philosophical system. Though he
might have been familiar with such symbology via the Neoplatonists, he
had too much respect for his audiences to burden them with these arcane
matters.

Monica Matei-Chesnoiu

Re: Wittenberg and Paris

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0234  Thursday, 1 February 2001

[1]     From:   R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 09:23:15 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0213 Re: Wittenberg and Paris

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 13:00:18 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0222 Re: Wittenberg and Paris


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 09:23:15 -0600
Subject: 12.0213 Re: Wittenberg and Paris
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0213 Re: Wittenberg and Paris

>About Hamlet - Wittenberg and Laertes - Paris...  I have heard it said
>that the connection may have something to do with Paris being a
>particularly Catholic bastion

The University of Paris was heavily represented among the Tridentine
doctors of the Church.

>and Wittenberg being a hotbed

hot or not it was the bed of Luther

>of
>Lutheranism/Calvinism, the latter being particularly interesting in
>light of Hamlet's questioning of all of his religious/spiritual
>assumptions.

who went to some lengths in his questioning

>Off in the wilds of Oregon and far from my usual reference
>material, I cannot seem to remember which famous person it was who did
>most of his work from Wittenberg! (It may have been one of the early
>scientists).
>
>The Protestant/Catholic argument might also be tied to questions of
>Providence (as in "special" Providence ala Calvin vs the Augustinian
>version) I apologize most sincerely for my fuzzy references but hope
>this helps stir discussion.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 13:00:18 -0500
Subject: 12.0222 Re: Wittenberg and Paris
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0222 Re: Wittenberg and Paris

Is Laertes asking permission to go to the University of Paris?  I have
always assumed a contrast between Hamlet's desire to study at Wittenberg
and Laertes' desire to play in Paris.  Consider the Paris of Bussy
D'Ambois (Chapman's that is [1595-1604]) -- a Paris of duels and
fornication. That sounds like a city where Laertes would like to live.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

Query on Shakespeare in Japan

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0232  Thursday, 1 February 2001

From:           Franklin J. Hildy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 10:03:18 -0500
Subject:        Query on Shakespeare in Japan

I hope someone on the list can help me with this problem.

When I attended the World Shakespeare Congress in Japan in 1991, I went
to a Theatre Museum in Tokyo. The front of the building was laid out
like the Archer/Godfrey reconstruction of the Fortune playhouse with a
full stage and stage posts as a porch and entrance stairs into the
building on either side. The building was originally built, as I recall,
in the 1920s and originally housed a Shakespeare organization (and may
still house such an organization on the upper floors.) Does anyone know
anything about this? Just getting the correct name would help me look it
up. I have misplaced my brochure on it and of course I need the
information within the next two weeks so I can't just wait for my
brochure to resurface. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

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