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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: January ::
Re: Rosalind
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0225  Wednesday, 31 January 2001

[1]     From:   John Marwick <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 23:44:45 +1300
        Subj:   When might Orlando 'catch on' about Ganymede?

[2]     From:   Judy Kennedy <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 10:25:27 -0400 (AST)
        Subj:   Rosalind and Ariadne


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Marwick <
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Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 23:44:45 +1300
Subject:        When might Orlando 'catch on' about Ganymede?

Some wonderful replies to previous posting about Celia's motivation and
the relationship with Rosalind.

Now that we have started rehearsals we have worked a little on the early
scenes and find no need to 'queer the relationship' as Arthur Lindley so
delicately puts it.  However, it is good to have our Celia thinking
carefully about what is going on for her - there are endless occasions
for eloquent if silent exchanges between Ros and Celia during the Forest
scenes with Ganymede and Orlando - but we need to be clear what the
relationship is and what Celia makes of it all.

We plan to go ahead with the idea of Orlando becoming aware of who
Ganymede is - but of course not 'letting on,'  It feels that this could
give another dimension to the relationship and add to Orlando's
character without detracting at all from Ros.  I was interested that
Evelyn Gajowki's students thought this happens in the BBC video - I must
get it out to watch.  I have recently come across a footnote in the
introduction to the Oxford Shakespeares version (by Alan Brissenden)
which says:

"In the 1961 American Shakespeare Festival prodcution (Conneticut, dir.
Word Baker) Orlando realizes 'Rosalind' was Rosalind when he took her
hand at this point [IV:1.116 - the mock marriage]; he let the audience
know he knew, but kept it from Rosalind until his reply to her line 'Why
do you speak too, "Why blame you me to love you?"' (V:2.101-2). The play
apparently survied this unusual interpretation."

Does anyone have any knowledge of this production? Couldn't find
anything on the Web so far.

We haven't yet got to this scene - but will next week.  I am inclined to
have Orlando know earlier in the scene.  Maybe even have him overhear
Ros and Celia talking about his being late. That way the scene will not
have any of the awkwardness of Orlando ?wanting to kiss a male Ganymede
- but will instead have a different set of twists for the audience who
knows he knows - and for Rosalind who probably starts to wonder if he
knows - but still carries on.

Has anyone got any other ideas of how to play it in this way - which
lines will take on interesting double meanings or where will I lose
things? It's not that I don't accept that the conventional disguise can
be totally effective if we want it to be - just that I'm interested to
pursue the delights of 'he knows that she knows, and she probably knows
that he knows' - but so long as neither one admits it to the other they
can still carry on having fun.

I expect we will also include the idea of Oliver catching on - that fits
very nicely in to the text at the end of IV:3 - and if Oliver 'twigs'
then surely it's reasonable that Orlando does too.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judy Kennedy <
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Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 2001 10:25:27 -0400 (AST)
Subject:        Rosalind and Ariadne

Belatedly, following the comments on Rosalind's possible response to
Orlando's wrestling prowess, I was struck by the passage in North's
Plutarch describing Ariadne's reaction to Theseus (in the version of the
legend where the antagonist is a man called Taurus rather than a
minotaur):

"And being a solemn custom in Creta, that the women should be present,
to see those open sports and fights, Ariadne being at these games,
amongst the rest, fell further in love with Theseus, seeing him so
goodly a person, so strong, and so invincible in wrestling, that he far
exceeded all that wrestled there that day.  King Minos was so glad that
he had taken away the honour from captain Taurus, that he sent him home
frank and free into his country,...."

Judy Kennedy

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