2001

Re: Literary vs. Theatrical Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0087  Tuesday, 16 January 2001

[1]     From:   Tony Burton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 15 Jan 2001 12:12:30 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0038 Re: Literary vs. Theatrical Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 15 Jan 2001 11:05:17 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0078 Re: Literary vs. Theatrical Shakespeare

[3]     From:   Paul Swanson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 15 Jan 2001 16:51:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0078 Re: Literary vs. Theatrical Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tony Burton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 15 Jan 2001 12:12:30 -0500
Subject: 12.0038 Re: Literary vs. Theatrical Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0038 Re: Literary vs. Theatrical Shakespeare

In his 1999 "TheSpirit of Britain" a survey history written for the
general public, the historian of Elizabethan art Roy Strong describes
the state of literacy in England as follows:

"Literacy was confined to a narrow band, by 1600 about 20% of men and 5%
of women.  Even then that represented a considerable increase.
Protestantism, with its stress on the word, was to be a keen driving
force, not to mention the ever-escalating demands of trade and
commerce.  Many could read, even if they could not write.  A large
percentage of north country gentry could certainly read but when it came
to a signature all they could do was make their mark.  Literacy was far
more widespread in the south-east so it is hardly surprising that it was
to be English as it was written and spoken there which was to become
standard."

If one accepts Strong's judgment-he is an art historian primarily and
may therefore be challenged or his bibliography impugned-the supposed
correspondence between literacy and the ability to sign one's name
disappears, as do any generalizations about literacy that do not apply
to Shakespeare's home county of Warwickshire, or his business world in
London (setting aside any consideration of his regular visits to Italy,
France, and Boston).  One might also surmise from Shakespeare's literary
proficiency that his own father was one of those who respected literary
accomplishment generally and therefore more likely than not to have been
among the 20% who did read.  His leadership position in the community
would rather strengthen this view than weaken it.  And, if the
proportion of readers was higher in London than elsewhere, the
proportion among those who attended Shakespeare's plays and enjoyed his
rhetorical sophistication and frequent recourse to classical and
historical literary sources, or to legal conundrums, technical terms,
and the like,  was higher still than the norm for the rest of the city.

Further, the demand for cheap quartos of his plays (enough to create a
market for printed stol'n and surreptitious copies) certainly encourages
the inference that his own admirers were among the reading population.
And last, the strong influence of the university wits in the theater at
large points to a close early connection with pretty high levels of
educational attainment among theater patrons.   I suspect Shakespeare
appealed to a pretty well-read crowd, even within the play-going
population.

Tony B

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 15 Jan 2001 11:05:17 -0800
Subject: 12.0078 Re: Literary vs. Theatrical Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0078 Re: Literary vs. Theatrical Shakespeare

Thanks to Marcus Dahl for quoting "a poet and a filthy play-maker"
(1618), especially as I happened to be looking for it this morning.  I
would like to add, though, that the professions were inverted by Thomas
Beard in 1597, describing Marlowe as "by profession a play-maker and a
poet of scurrility".

Cheers, and thanks again,
Se


New Play Shows Shakespeare's Characters in Revolt

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0086  Monday, 15 January 2001

From:           Robert J. Matter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 15 Jan 2001 10:47:33 -0600
Subject:        New Play Shows Shakespeare's Characters in Revolt Against Him

Here is a story about a new play by Naomi Claire Wallace called "Mad
William" in which Hamlet, Macbeth and King Lear meet in a 20th century
London pub and discuss their resentment at having to die in every
performance.

http://www.cnn.com/2001/books/news/01/12/shakespeares.people.ap/index.html

-Bob Matter
Hammond, IN

Re: Henry VIII

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0084  Monday, 15 January 2001

From:           Asami Nakayama <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 14 Jan 2001 11:54:33 +0900
Subject:        Re: Henry VIII

In Margaret George's novel, THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF HENRY VIII, Henry's
body is said to have emitted red liquid after it had been placed in the
coffin. The narrator doesn't say the liquid was blood. He just says it
was mysterious and weird.  It is a fiction, but is based on an enormous
amount of research by the author. If there had been such a catching
episode as the exploding body, Ms George wouldn't have failed to include
it in her novel. Anyway, the body was embalmed, so it couldn't have been
so much decomposed that it eventually exploded!

Asami Nakayama

P.S. I didn't know Oscar Wilde exploded in his casket <Emma French. Is
there a tradition of tales about exploding bodies?

Shakespeare Position

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0085  Monday, 15 January 2001

From:           Jeff Powers-Beck <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 14 Jan 2001 14:06:03 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare Position

Assistant Professor, tenure-track beginning August 2001. Ph.D.  required
with specialty in Shakespeare. Twelve-hour/semester teaching load also
includes freshman composition and sophomore literature. Responsibilities
include research, service, and advising.  Application, c.v. and three
letters of recommendation by Feb. 26, 2001, to Dr. Jeff Powers-Beck,
Search Committee Chair, Dept. of English, Box 70683, East Tennessee
State University, Johnson City, TN 37614.

Reminder: CFP

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0083  Monday, 15 January 2001

From:           Rachana Sachdev <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 12 Jan 2001 23:05:39 -0500
Subject:        Reminder: CFP

Call for Papers

Cultural Performances

Sixth Annual Undergraduate Shakespeare Conference

March 16-17, 2001

Susquehanna University

Papers, workshops, interactive presentations, and performances that
explore the issues of race, ethnicity, class and gender within the plays
and within stage and film adaptations of Shakespeare's plays are
especially welcome.  Special consideration will be given to work on A
Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello,
Merchant of Venice, Titus Andronicus and. Antony and Cleopatra.

Highlights:
"X Shakespeare in Performance
"X Shakespeare and Film
"X Workshops on Individual Plays
"X Traditional Paper Sessions

The two best essays will be awarded prizes of $300 and $200
respectively.

Designed to foster scholarship at the undergraduate level, this
conference provides a forum where undergraduates may exchange ideas,
creatively rework texts, and present research in a semi-formal setting.

Papers should be about 7-9 pages long (reading time about 15 minutes).
Each workshop and performance will be allotted 25-40 minutes, and
leaders need to plan their ideas and activities accordingly. E-mail
submissions are welcome.

The conference will start on Friday, March 16, and will include two
plenary speakers as well. Sessions will run through the day on Saturday,
and we will conclude with a post-conference party on Saturday evening.
Selinsgrove offers inexpensive accommodations, and some room subsidies
are available.

Please send one to two page abstracts and brief biographical information
by January 15 to:

Dr. Rachana Sachdev                             Carl Steidel
514 University Avenue                           Susquehanna University
Selinsgrove, PA 17870-1001      AND             514 University Avenue
Phone:(570) 372-4200                            Selinsgrove, PA 17870
Fax:    (570) 372-2774                          Phone: (570) 372-3393
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.                      email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.