2001

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0485  Thursday, 1 March 2001

[1]     From:   Pat Dolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Feb 2001 21:58:50 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0471 Re: Bard Bade Goodbye

[2]     From:   Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Mar 2001 06:16:09 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0471 Re: Bard Bade Goodbye


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Dolan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 28 Feb 2001 21:58:50 -0600
Subject: 12.0471 Re: Bard Bade Goodbye
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0471 Re: Bard Bade Goodbye

>Can you see our students, off their
>own bats, hacking a path past Eminem to literary giants to fuel their
>hunger for expressiveness on that rich scale?

My students? Absolutely, positively, emphatically yes. If I didn't think
so, none of us would have a chance. And insofar as any teacher doesn't
think so, he/she makes it more difficult for his/her students.

BTW, I got to Beckett through Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov, thence
to Joyce, thence to Webster, thence to Shakespeare, with many others
along the way. Good teachers, who didn't think I was stupid
because--adolescent boy that I was--I liked SF, never batted an eye.
When we're puers (and puellae) we tend to be puerile. If we weren't we
wouldn't need teachers.

Cheers,
Pat

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Mar 2001 06:16:09 EST
Subject: 12.0471 Re: Bard Bade Goodbye
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0471 Re: Bard Bade Goodbye

Before this subject gets more silly...two penny's worth: Eminem famously
read the dictionary to feed his rhymes (look what Johnson started). The
comparison with S' s day is surely fatuous as there was no equivalent
'national curriculum' in S's day and the books S would have read in
grammar school were surely just as representative of whatever published
'school' texts were then currently available (Schoenbaum merely uses
representative samples for his analysis of S's schooldays). Furthermore
S  never had access to the internet every night after school - in which
he could find any number of his own works plus those of Holinshed, Ovid,
Plutarch and yea anyone else he did think to find.

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