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Home :: Archive :: 2001 :: March ::
Re: Poets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 12.0495  Friday, 2 March 2001

[1]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Thursday, 01 Mar 2001 13:02:27 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 12.0479 Re: Poets

[2]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Thursday, 01 Mar 2001 14:04:51 -0600
        Subj:   Poets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Thursday, 01 Mar 2001 13:02:27 -0500
Subject: 12.0479 Re: Poets
Comment:        Re: SHK 12.0479 Re: Poets

The first sentence of my posting on poets and Shakespeare should have
read, "I'm sure there are many people who teach and publish articles and
books about Shakespeare who alse write and publish poems."

[Editor's Note: I confess: the fault is not in your stars, David, but in
your editor.]

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Thursday, 01 Mar 2001 14:04:51 -0600
Subject:        Poets

>. . . During the
>time of my own professional apprenticeship, in the 60s and early 70s,
>the ethos of English departments in America discouraged academic
>scholars from actually making the kind of thing they studied--my >mentors tended to regard actual poets and novelists rather as >physicists regarded engineers.. . .

Thus Dave Evett on poems by faculty members in English Departments.
Reminds me that before I got to Univ. of Texas in 1969, in the tenure
crunch a published poem was called a "note" as if to turn creative
writing into literary scholarship.  Wild . . .

Cheers for poems by scholars.  May I recommend Yeats's poem The
Scholars? It is funny, about fussy old men shuffling to and fro and
completely oblivious of the poet who lies in his bed at night anguished
over the loved object he is going to write erotic poetry about that they
will annotate having forgotten what young love is all about.

Here's to poetry!

John Velz
 

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